Ford F-250 Super Duty 3rd Generation 2011-2016 (P473) Review

Everything You Need To Know Before Buying A Used Ford F-250 Super Duty 3rd Gen

Read in this article:

3rd Generation Ford F-250: What Owners Say

  • The 3rd-gen F-250 is known for its towing ability.
  • Ford offers a huge variety of models and powertrains, so finding the right truck for you won't be difficult.
  • It glides beautifully for a ladder-frame truck.
  • The 3rd-gen Ford F-250 has a refined, albeit low-quality interior.
  • It feels like an odd thing to complain about, but owners were not impressed with the F-250's steering. It's best described as numb.
  • The Ford F-250 3rd generation has awkward rear seats.

Ford F-250 Super Duty Third Generation Facelift

The 3rd-generation Ford F-250 was introduced in 2011 with a new body, new engine options, and an all-new interior. Because it's a workhorse more than anything else, Ford didn't bother with a facelift during the six-year lifespan of the 3rd-generation Ford F-250 Super Duty.

There were notable upgrades along the way. In 2013, Ford added a Platinum trim for ranch owners and upgraded the brakes. In 2015, it improved the diesel powertrain with more power and better fuel economy.

Front View Ford
F-250 Super Duty 3rd Generation Front View
Rear Angle View Ford
F-250 Super Duty 3rd Generation Rear View

Engine, Transmission, and Drivetrain

There are two engines available, both of them brutes. Each Ford F-250 third-generation engine is mated to a six-speed automatic transmission and RWD as standard. A part-time 4WD system was an optional extra on all models. The gas engine is a traditional large capacity 6.2-liter V8, while the diesel option is a turbocharged 6.7-liter V8. The diesel made 390 hp and 735 lb-ft of torque when it was new, but Ford introduced a software upgrade in 2015 that boosted the outputs to 400 hp and 800 lb-ft. The good news is that this upgrade is still available for free at Ford dealerships.

6.2-liter V8 Naturally Aspirated SOHC Boss
385 hp | 405 lb-ft
Horsepower
385 hp
Torque
405 lb-ft
Transmission
Six-speed automatic

The 6.2-liter V8 is the most readily available engine option you'll find. This is largely due to the diesel being more expensive and intended for heavier lifting. That said, the gas V8 is hardly a slouch. It has enough power to make even a vehicle as large as the F-250 feel brisk, but it's the tow rating and payload capacity that matter most. When properly equipped, the gas-powered 2016 Super Duty can tow up to 12,500 lbs conventionally and up to 15,700 lbs with a gooseneck. In the right body configuration, it can carry up to nearly 2,800 lbs in the bed. For most people, the gas V8 is sufficient. Its issues are well-document and we mention them later on; suffice to say that the basic design is solid and if you can sort out the peripherals such as emissions equipment and if you treat the spark plugs with care, it will soldier on for many years. Outputs remained 385 hp and 405 lb-ft for the entire production run of six years.

6.7-liter V8 Diesel Twin-Turbocharged OHV Scorpion
390/400/440 hp | 735/800/860 lb-ft
Horsepower
390/400/440 hp
Torque
735/800/860 lb-ft
Transmission
Six-speed automatic transmission

Looking at the figures above, you'll note that the optional diesel engine nearly doubles the torque output of the gas V8, and at lower rpm. This makes it perfect for towing. In the right configuration, the 2016 F-250 can tow up to 14,000 lbs conventionally and up to 16,600 lbs with a gooseneck - and carry over 4,200 lbs on the bed. This is the main reason to go for the diesel option. Thanks to that giant lump of torque, the F-250 hardly notices large loads. It has an unusual layout in that it retains traditional OHV valve gear with pushrods, but there are four valves per cylinder, making it a 32-valve OHV engine. It started out with 390 hp and 735 lb-ft but was soon uprated to 400 hp and 800 lb-ft for 2012.

However, Ford went a little bleeding-edge with its tech initially, employing somewhat small, fragile turbochargers with ceramic ball bearings that failed on 2011 and 2012 cars. There were various other sensor and fuel-system problems too. Most of its issues were sorted out by the engine's second generation from 2015, so unless extensive remedial and preventative work has been done on earlier engines, they're best avoided. That second generation is also more powerful, delivering 440 hp and 860 lb-ft.

2011-2019 Ford F-250 Super Duty Real MPG

The EPA doesn't provide estimated consumption figures for this class of vehicle, but various online resources have databases on user-submitted real-world figures. As you'd expect, the F-250 isn't ashamed to decimate a tank of gas. The diesel's combined consumption is significantly better. The gas models' figures vary from 11 to 14 mpg on average, with the bulk of the figures concentrated around the 12-mpg mark. Almost no users could do better than 16 mpg at best and the worst figures hovered around 6-7 mpg. The diesel varies between 13 and 17 mpg, with the biggest concentration of submissions claiming 15 mpg - 3 mpg better than the gas engine. Almost no users could get any better than 19 mpg in light running and the worst figures were around 10 mpg.

EPA MPGReal-World MPG *
6.2 V8N/A11-14
6.7 V8 TurbodieselN/A13-17

* Real-world mpg and MPGe figures are provided by the EPA. Once a car has been on sale for a significant period of time, the EPA gets real-world figures directly from the customer base. These figures are then provided on the EPA website. Real-world figures are not available for certain models due to a lack of sales, or not enough people partaking in this after-sales survey.

Safety

The first model years are a bit too old to boast any advanced safety features, but all 2011 models come with the obligatory ABS brakes, traction and stability control, trailer-sway assist, hill assist, a post-crash alert system, and six airbags. XLT and higher trims have an integrated trailer-brake controller, while the Lariat and higher have rear parking sensors and an auto-dimming rear-view mirror. Even a rearview camera was an optional extra on XLT and Lariat models, with only the King Ranch having it as standard equipment. 2012 models come with upgraded brakes, and that's about it. It's worth remembering that high-end models all have rear park assist, and you might want to keep an eye out for an F-250 with a rearview camera.

US NHTSA Crash Test Result (2016)

The F-250 has a decent safety rating, scoring four out of five stars overall.

Regular Cab, Supercab 4x2

Overall Rating::
(4/5)
Frontal Barrier Crash Rating::
(3/5)
Side Crash Rating::
(5/5)
Rollover Rating::
(4/5)

Regular Cab, Supercab 4x4

Overall Rating:
(4/5)
Frontal Barrier Crash Rating:
(3/5)
Side Crash Rating:
(5/5)
Rollover Rating:
(3/5)

Super Crew Cab 4x2

Overall Rating:
(4/5)
Frontal Barrier Crash Rating:
(4/5)
Side Crash Rating:
(5/5)
Rollover Rating:
(4/5)

Super Crew Cab 4x4

Overall Rating:
(4/5)
Frontal Barrier Crash Rating:
(4/5)
Side Crash Rating:
(5/5)
Rollover Rating:
(3/5)

F-250 3rd-Generation Trims

The Ford F-250 third generation is available in five trims, with the top-spec Platinum only available from 2013. The five trims are XL, XLT, Lariat, King Ranch, and Platinum. Before you get to the trim, you first need to select the body style. The F-250 is available in Regular Cab, SuperCab, and CrewCab. The Regular Cab comes with an eight-foot bed, while the SuperCab and CrewCab are available with a 6.8 or eight-foot bed. If you want a King Ranch or a Platinum, it's going to have to be a CrewCab. The most luxurious workhorse is the Lariat in the SuperCab body style. Trims generally follow on each other, with each successive trim sporting all the equipment of the preceding one, unless otherwise noted.

XL
2011-2016
Engine
6.2-liter gas V8 / 6.7-liter turbo-diesel V8
Transmission
Six-speed automatic
Drivetrain
4x2 or 4x4

The XL is a work truck. On the outside, it has a basic black grille and bumpers, 17-inch steel wheels, and manually telescoping trailer-tow side mirrors. It only comes with the basic comfort necessities like vinyl for both the floor covering and the seat upholstery, a 40/20/40-split front bench seat, a manually tilting/telescoping steering column, manual air-conditioning, and a basic AF/FM radio with two speakers.

XLT
2011-2016
Engine
6.2-liter gas V8 / 6.7-liter turbo-diesel V8
Transmission
Six-speed automatic
Drivetrain
4x2 or 4x4

The XLT is essentially a more glamorous work truck, as the exterior gains chrome on the grille and bumpers, heated side mirrors, and 18-inch alloy wheels. If you are in the market for a work truck, it's worth spending a little more on the XLT trim. It adds keyless entry, cruise control, power windows and door locks, cloth upholstery, lockable storage under the rear seats, a power outlet, floor carpeting, and a four-speaker CD/MP3 player with an AUX jack.

Lariat
2011-2016
Engine
6.2-liter gas V8 / 6.7-liter turbo-diesel V8
Transmission
Six-speed automatic
Drivetrain
4x2 or 4x4

The Lariat is the highest trim available to the two work truck body styles. Over and above the XLT's features, it comes with front fog lights, rear parking sensors, tubular chrome sidesteps, a power-sliding rear window, and electrically telescoping side mirrors. Inside, it gains dual-zone climate control, leather upholstery, woodgrain trim, power-adjustable pedals, ten-way power front seats, a center front seat that converts into a console, a 4.2-inch display with a trip computer in the instrument cluster, and an auto-dimming rear-view mirror. Ford's Sync software with voice activation is standard, integrated with an eight-speaker audio system, as well as satellite radio.

King Ranch
2011-2016
Engine
6.2-liter gas V8 / 6.7-liter turbo-diesel V8
Transmission
Six-speed automatic
Drivetrain
4x2 or 4x4

King Ranch was the top-trim until Ford launched the Platinum two years later. Other than a two-tone paint job, the King Ranch also adds body-color exterior accents, heated and ventilated front seats, remote start, and navigation.

Platinum
2013-2016
Engine
6.2-liter gas V8 / 6.7-liter turbo-diesel V8
Transmission
Six-speed automatic
Drivetrain
4x2 or 4x4

The Platinum is essentially the same as the King Ranch, but more subtle. Instead of two-tone paint, it comes with a single color combined with 20-inch alloy wheels. It also has a plush upmarket leather interior.

Third Generation Ford F-250 Features

XLXLTLariatKing RanchPlatinum
Back-Up CameraN/AN/ASSS
Bluetooth ConnectionN/ASSSS
Leather SeatsN/AN/AN/ASS
Keyless EntrySSSSS
Keyless StartN/AN/AN/ASS
HD RadioN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A
Alloy WheelsN/ASSSS
SunroofN/AN/AN/AN/AN/A

Interior, Trim, And Practicality

Interior Overview Ford

The F-250 is a massive truck, no matter what body style you select. It obviously limits the seating, but Ford gets around this by offering a three-seat bench in the front row. Combined with the three-row bench in the second row, you get seating for six. From the Lariat trim, two front bucket seats are standard, taking the total seat count down to five. The extended or SuperCab has rear-hinged small doors to make access to the rear bench easier, but it's still not as practical as the CrewCab.

Interior quality is not the best, especially on the basic Regular Cab. The vinyl seats don't age well, but the cloth and leather on higher-trim models do add an aura of luxury. The buttons also feel cheap, but at least the layout is easy to understand. The dial for the part-time four-wheel-drive system is within easy reach, as is the traction control button.

Being a truck, it is extremely practical. Even CrewCab models can be had with the larger eight-foot bed with a maximum load capacity in excess of 4,000 lbs.

TrimXLXLTLariatKing RanchPlatinum
VinylSN/AN/AN/AN/A
ClothN/ASSN/AN/A
LeatherN/AN/AN/ASS

2011-2016 Ford F-250 Maintenance and Cost

There's no shortage of Ford dealers or third-party workshops that will look after the F-250. Like most vehicles, you can expect to pay $150 for a basic oil change on the gas model. It will be at least double that for the diesel because it has a huge 13.1-quart oil capacity and an expensive filter to keep the huge twin-turbocharged 32-valve unit properly lubricated and protected. A lubrication service every 7,500 miles costs around $160 at an independent shop and around $200 at a Ford dealership (around $210 and $280, respectively, for the diesel). Replace the oil every 5,000 miles if the truck does a lot of towing or is operated in freezing environments.

A 15,000-mile service costs around $300 independently and around $365 at Ford ($490 and $620 respectively, for the diesel), while you should budget around $1,300 for a major service every 60,000 miles at an independent shop or around $1,700 at Ford. For the diesel, the 60,000-mile service is cheaper, ranging from $700 to $900. Keep in mind that the Boss gas V8 uses two spark plugs per cylinder, so there are 16 in total.

Ford F-250 P473 Basic Service

Engine Oil Change Including Filter

6.2-liter Boss V8 gas

Oil capacity: 6.6L (7 quarts)

Recommended oil type: 5W-20 (5W-30 for 2016)

How often to change: 7,500 miles

Average price: Around $82

6.7-liter Scorpion V8 turbo-diesel

Oil capacity: 12.4L (13.1 quarts)

Recommended oil type: 10W-30 for above freezing, 5W-40 for below

How often to change: 7,500 miles

Average price: Around $187-$193

Sparkplugs

6.2 Boss V8 gas

Part code: SP526X

Price: $127 for 16.

6.7 Scorpion V8 diesel (glow plugs)

Part code: ZD17 (12A342)

Price: $459 for eight

Air filter

6.2 Boss V8 gas

Part code: FA1883B7 (9601)

Price: $25

6.7 Scorpion V8 diesel

Part code: FA1902 (9601)

Price: $53

Battery:

All models

Description: Group Size 65 750 CCA

Replacement: Every 3 to 5 years.

Average Price: $210

3rd Gen Ford F-250 Tires

XL, 2011-2014 XLT
Tire size:
245/75R17
All-season:
$848-$1,208 per set
2011-2013 Lariat, 2011-2013 King Ranch, 2015-2016 XLT
Tire size:
275/65R18
All-season:
$984-$1,296 per set
2014-2016 Lariat, 2014-2016 King Ranch
Tire size:
275/70R18
All-season:
$948-$1,244 per set
Platinum
Tire size:
275/65R20
All-season:
$1,211-$1,460 per set

Check Before You Buy

Technical Service Bulletins according to the NHTSA. Check service book for:

There are surprisingly few 2011-2016 Ford F-250 Super Duty recalls. All model years were recalled in 2020 for a steering system that may lock up. This recall was limited to just 102 units, however. Early models were also installed with the incorrect body control module, which was a fire risk.

There was an early transmission recall. The driver could shift out of park without pressing the brake. The 2013 and 2104 model years are recall-free, while the 2015 MY was recalled for an incorrect rearview camera display and a transmission calibration error. The latter affected less than 4,000 cars.

During its final year on sale, the 2016 MY was recalled for possible damage to the tire inside wall. This also affected less than 2,300 units.

  • Codes P0087, P0088, and P0089 are signs of fuel-pressure problems. This could point to fuelling, fuel pump, and fuel pump vent problems.
  • Code P0073 indicates that the vehicle's ambient air temperature sensor is faulty.
  • Code P0457 is for a large leak in the EVAP system, while Code P0456 is for a small leak. It's related to Code P0474, which is tied to the exhaust system back pressure sensor.
  • Code P0446 is for an EVAP vent control malfunction.
  • Code P0128 indicates that the coolant temperature sensor is too low. It's a common problem, and the main cause is the coolant thermostat being stuck open.
  • Code P0532 is a problem with the air conditioning refrigerant pressure sensor. The most common cause is the refrigerant levels being too low, causing AC, air conditioning, or climate control problems.
  • Code P0111 points to air intake sensor problems.
  • Code P0230 indicates a problem with the fuel pump.
  • Code P0765 warns of a faulty shift solenoid on the transmission.
  • Code P0243 points to either a faulty wastegate or wastegate solenoid.
  • Code P0401 means the exhaust gas recirculation system is faulty.
  • Codes P0351 to P0360 expose faulty ignition coils. The exact code will tell you where to look.
  • Code P0300 points to an engine misfire. Codes P0301 to P0308 will narrow down the right cylinder.
  • Code P0460 indicates that there is a discrepancy between the fuel gauge and the actual amount of fuel in the truck's tank.
  • Code P0196 shows that the engine oil temperature is too high.
  • Code P06B6 points to an engine knock on both the gas and diesel engines.
  • Code P0170 indicates that the fuel trim is outside of the OEM specification.

3rd Gen F-250 Common Problems

6.2-Liter “Boss” Gas V8 Engine Problems

The Boss engine is generally regarded as reliable, as it was developed from Ford's 4.6-liter modular V8, which powered countless police-cruiser Crown Vics. It's not uncommon for them to exceed 300,000 miles or more with proper care. Ford gave it an iron block for added durability, knowing that it would be used in a truck. Unsurprisingly, there are few catastrophic 6.2L V8 problems. Still, there are common problems to keep an eye out for. Valve-spring failure leads to misfires, power loss, rattling sounds, and rough running. Replacing valve springs is not a tough job, though it is time-consuming because you have to replace a total of 16 on this engine. The springs themselves are so cheap, you can just as well replace the lot to be sure, while you're at it.

The second thing to keep an eye on is oil leaks. This isn't necessarily a common problem with the Boss engine, but rather a general wear-and-tear issue that all cars tend to develop. The weak spots on this engine include the rubber valve-cover gasket, oil-pan gaskets, main seals, and the baffle on the right-hand side valve cover. Keeping an eye on the oil level is crucial, and a small amount of leakage isn't a major problem. You might want to take a closer look once you smell oil burning, as it indicates a larger leak. Thankfully, oil gaskets are cheap, and if you know your way around an engine you should have no trouble replacing them. The Boss engine uses 16 spark plugs, so the ignition system is rather complicated and anything that goes wrong with it can affect the engine's running. Changing sparkplugs is routine maintenance, and worth doing if you experience any sort of misfits, shudder, or rough idling. Spark plugs lead shorter lives in hardworking engines used for hauling and towing, so they have to be replaced timeously to avoid running problems.

Oil consumption can also become an issue on the Boss as it ages. It's more often a faulty positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system causing it rather than the engine itself and can be avoided by servicing and cleaning the PCV system regularly and avoiding periods of prolonged idling. Meticulous maintenance and frequent oil changes can defer PCV problems for a long time.

Mileage: Oil leaks from around 100,000 miles. Faulty valve springs can fail at any time. Spark-plug life varies according to usage patterns, so keep an eye on the engine's running. PCV valves can get stuck due to usage patterns and lax maintenance at any time.

Cost: Valve springs only cost around $6 each but the labor to replace them all can be as much as $700. Oil gaskets are cheap, but depending on which ones must be replaced, the labor can add up to over $500.

How to spot: Valve-spring failure will trigger fault codes, illuminate the Check Engine light, and cause misfiring, rough running, rattling sounds, and power loss. Oil leaks should be visible and may cause the oil level to drop if they're big, leading to other problems if left unchecked. Tired spark plugs will cause stuttering, misfires, hesitation, rough running, and power loss. Increased oil consumption will show in a dropping oil level and perhaps even some smoke from the exhaust.

6.7-Liter Power Stroke “Scorpion” Diesel V8 Engine Problems

The Scorpion is generally regarded as a reliable engine, though it's worth remembering that it was brand-new when Ford introduced it in 2011. The first generation of this engine from 2011 to 2014 had some expensive teething issues, so it's a good idea to stay away from those model years. One of the most common 6.7L Powerstroke engine problems on early engines is the Bosch CP4.2 high-pressure fuel-injection pump. Metal-to-metal contact inside the pump, exacerbated by air bubbles, can produce metal particles that start to circulate and destroy the pump, injectors, fuel lines, regulators, and more, requiring the replacement of much of the fuel-injection system at an eye-watering cost. These failures led to a class-action lawsuit and Ford replaced the pump with an updated one. A bad pump can cause a big power loss, stalling, a no-start condition, and poor running. Be sure that the vehicle has been fitted with the updated pump and is running sweetly.

The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler can also fail because its valve gets stuck due to excessive soot/carbon build-up on the EGR heater core, clogging it. It can cause overheating and will definitely trigger the Check Engine light and the P0401 fault code. The EGR cooler has to be replaced to fix the problem but many owners opt to delete it instead, in which case the problem will never return. Keep in mind that there are emissions-related and, consequently, legal concerns if you delete emissions-control equipment. Coolant leaks are not uncommon and the leak sites are usually the primary radiator, the turbo intake, or the EGR valve. A primary radiator may cost up to $400 to replace; some owners install upgraded after-market items but these can be even more expensive. The work can be done by a competent DIYer. The 2011 and 2012 engines used small GT32 SST turbochargers with ceramic ball bearings and these turbochargers tended to fail entirely. They were replaced by larger turbochargers using steel ball bearings from 2013, which solved the problem. Early models also suffered from breaking glow plugs, which can cause catastrophic damage when the engine ingests the pieces.

The "Six-seven" tends to suffer from various sensor problems. The exhaust gas temperature (EGT) sensors are known for being problematic - and there are four of them. Failure of any one of them triggers an engine warning light and a bunch of fault codes. We know some owners simply remove the sensors, but this could lead to an emissions test failure. They are easy enough to access from underneath the car and cost between $35 to $50 each to replace. Some owners even carry spares with them. Failure of EGT sensor 13 might disable the engine unless Ford's 2015 PCM software update has been applied. NOx sensors on 2011-2013 engines are also troublesome and trigger limp mode when they fail.

Mileage: Most of the problems are dependent on usage and maintenance, such as the EGR system. Others are simply due to faulty components and can happen at any mileage, such as the EGT sensors and injection pump.

Cost: Only around $35 to $50 for an EGT sensor and you can replace them yourself. The EGR cooler kit costs around $300. If you want to delete it, the kit to do that costs around $400. On early models, you can expect to pay more than $2,000 to replace the turbo. To fix and replace everything that a bad injection pump can destroy can cost more than $10,000, so obtain proof that the pump was replaced and paid for by Ford.

How to spot: Faulty EGT sensors will cause the engine to fail its emissions test and will produce fault codes and the Check Engine light. A clogged EGR system might cause overheating and will produce error code P0402, plus the Check Engine light. A diesel with injection pump problems will stall, struggle to start, and will idle rough. If it has turbo problems, you'll see smoke or even oil from the exhaust, experience power loss due to a lack of boost pressure, and you'll hear the turbo whine.

Death Wobble

Owners also refer to it as "hyper shaking". At least the power steering, vibration, and suspension problems are easier to diagnose here. Unbalanced or damaged, out-of-round wheels and tires or worn-out shock absorbers can start a wobble at speed that can become dangerous, not too unlike the one that happens to some Jeep Wranglers. Damaged suspension sometimes occurs on hardworking trucks used on rough terrain and many of the 2011-2016 Ford F250 Super Duty's vibration, suspension, and drag-link problems are due to damaged or worn-out components such as ball joints and track bars.

Mileage: Around 34,000-67,000 miles in terms of worn items and at any time in case of damage.

Cost: It costs anywhere from $500 to $3,000 to sort the death wobble, depending on the diagnosis and what must be replaced/repaired. New shock absorbers should be less than $500.

How to spot: During the test drive, you'll notice shakes and wobbles that aren't supposed to be there as speeds increase. Also, stay away from F-250s with aftermarket lift kits and oversized wheels.

Hard Shifts

Several owners complained about transmission problems or, to be more specific, shifting problems. It's referred to as "hard," though there doesn't appear to be a solution other than replacing the transmission pump, which does not appear to fix the problem. We guess it's just the quality of the shift that's not up to certain people's standards in a heavy-duty truck like this. Make sure that the transmission fluid was replaced on schedule and that all powertrain software updates have been performed.

Mileage: From around 42,000 miles.

Cost: N/A

How to spot: Since this problem appears to be subjective, put the F-250 through as many shift patterns as you can. Accelerate hard, overtake on the highway, etc. If the gearbox spoils the ride, you might want to review its service history and make sure it received fresh oil on schedule - or shop around for a different truck.

Less Common Problems and Problem-Free Areas

There are reported brake problems on earlier models, but not anything dangerous. The brakes just tend to wear out quickly or the rotors warp and start to shudder, which are not uncommon problems on big trucks like this. The occasional Boss gas engine has been known to eject the odd spark plug, damaging the thread in the process and requiring a cylinder head replacement to the tune of $400 or more. There are 16 spark plugs; treat them gingerly. Delaminating fuel tanks can clog the fuel system and replacing the tank can cost over $2,000, in addition to repairs to the rest of the system. Thankfully, it's not too common.

While there are known trouble spots, the following systems are generally very reliable:

  • There are few Ford F-250 power-door-lock, power-window, instrument-cluster, backup camera, traction-control, starter, or other electrical problems to report.
  • The drivetrain is tough and there aren't many Ford F-250 4-wheel-drive or transfer-case problems.

Which One To Avoid

The fact that Ford upgraded the brakes for the 2013 model year is sort of proof that more powerful brakes were justified. For that reason, we'd avoid the 2011 and 2012 models.

As for the Scorpion diesel engine, we'd stay well away from all 2011 to 2014 models. The initial teething issues can become extremely expensive to fix, and it's a much better idea to avoid them completely. 2011 was by far the worst year in terms of the overall number of problems owners encountered.

Which One To Buy

It depends entirely on what you want to do. If you're here for towing, you can't go wrong with the V8 diesel. The engine is epic and it provides giant lumps of torque. Just stay away from the earlier models, but a post-2014 model should be reliable. The 2015 and 2016 diesels are also significantly more powerful - by 40 hp and 60 lb-ft. For everything else, the gas V8 should be fine. If you want a work truck, get a Lariat in the body style that suits your needs with a V8 diesel engine. If you want a mix between ruggedness and luxury, find al Platinum with either engine.

3rd Gen Ford F-250 Super Duty Verdict

The 3rd-gen F-250 Super Duty is a decent truck with a strong reputation. It has some minor problems, mostly related to its inherent flaws as a truck. It can tow with ease, the V8 diesel is an absolute powerhouse, and the ride is refined. The F-250 works as both a work truck and a lifestyle vehicle, or a little bit of both.

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