007's Stolen Aston Martin DB5 Has Finally Been Found

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An Aston Martin DB5 used in 'Goldfinger' was stolen in 1997 and has been missing ever since.

When it starred in the 1964 James Bond film 'Goldfinger,' the Aston Martin DB5 instantly became one of the most famous cars in the world. Its legacy still lives on today. Nearly 50 years later, James Bond will once again be behind the wheel of a DB5 loaded with gadgets and weapons in 'No Time to Die.' It will be one of several Aston Martins appearing in the film, including a DBS Superleggera and a Valhalla prototype.

Hardcore James Bond fans can even buy a DB5 Continuation Car with working gadgets, but one of the original movie cars has been missing for nearly 25 years. In 1997, one of the original DB5s used in 'Goldfinger' was stolen from a private hanger in Boca Raton Airport in Florida and hasn't been seen since.

Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin

One of four DB5s built for the film, the car that was stolen was the only example with working gadgets and is now worth around £18.2 million ($24.8 million). It was bought for $275,000 in 1986 by American businessman Anthony Pugliese before it was stolen in Florida.

As reported by The Telegraph, Elizabeth Hurley has revealed new information about the stolen DB5's location in a podcast series called 'The Most Famous Car In The World'. Allegedly, the missing movie car was recently spotted in the Middle East with a VIN number matching the stolen DB5. According to the source, the DB5 is stashed in a private car collection in either Saudi Arabia, Dubai, Kuwait, or Bahrain, so it's hopefully only a matter of time before it gets tracked down.

Universal Pictures
Universal Pictures
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"There are major automobile collectors in those countries and I have intelligence that the car could be in one of them and may have even traveled between them," Christopher A. Marinello of Art Recovery International told the Telegraph. "I'm hopeful that the possessor will come forward voluntarily before I have to make an announcement. It's my policy to give possessors of stolen and looted objects every opportunity to do the right thing."

Marinello believes the current owner didn't know the car was stolen. The podcast is offering a $100,000 reward for anyone who can help locate the stolen DB5.

Eon Productions
Eon Productions
Source Credits: Telegraph

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