$1.3 Million Praga Bohema Is A Nissan GT-R-Powered Hypercar With 700 HP

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The little-known Czech brand opted for a Nissan GT-R powerplant.

Praga is a 115-year-old Czech company that typically builds go-karts, race cars, and even airplanes. But now, it's getting into the track-focused, street-legal supercar business. Introducing the Praga Bohema, a nearly $1.3 million supercar that was teased earlier this month. But today is the real deal, so let's get cracking.

The limited-edition Bohema is powered by the 3.8-liter twin-turbocharged V6 from the Nissan GT-R, though it's been modified by UK engineering firm Litchfield, which strips it down and converts it to a dry sump that reduces height by 5.5-inches. Doing so enables the engine to sit lower in the vehicle and helps prevent the risks of oil surging under high-speed cornering.

Another engine mod is new twin turbos, which help produce up to 700 horsepower at 6,800 rpm and 535 lb-ft of torque from 3,000 to 6,000 rpm. If you recall, Litchfield has also been responsible for 1,000+ horsepower GT-Rs.

Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga

Bohema opted for a Hewland sequential gearbox through a robotic clutch for a semi-automatic driving mode. The Praga's projected top speed is a blistering 186 mph (the highest realistic speed possible on a race track, Praga claims), and reaches 62 mph from a standstill in less than 2.3 seconds.

Total weight is a targeted 2,165 pounds without fuel, and it can deliver 1,984 pounds of downforce at 155 mph. Both the engine and transmission are mounted independently from the carbon chassis to prevent annoying sub-woofer-style resonance and vibrations. Beneath the in-house designed exterior panels is a carbon fiber monocoque. Praga worked with former F1 driver turned IndyCar racer Romain Grosjean for additional fine-tuning to achieve GT3 race car lap times.

"I was astonished by the Bohema's amazing performance on the track, its accessibility on the road, and the ease of transition between the two," said Grosjean. "Praga truly delivered on my challenge! On the road, you get a smooth ride, the car eliminates the bumps, you can chat with the passenger, and everything is calm and OK. Then simply switch focus, and you are on the track."

Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga

The Bohema, like other racecars, utilizes pushrod-operated adjustable dampers mounted horizontally, which are linked to central-locked 18-inch wheels up front and 19 inches at the rear. Praga went with lightweight 380 mm carbon ceramic disc brakes with six-piston calipers.

The two-seat interior boasts a narrow, aerodynamically-designed two-seat cockpit with clever ergonomics, a fully adjustable driver's seat, plenty of luggage space, 56 individual carbon parts, Alcantara and leather trim, and a digital instrument display mounted in the middle, but there's no infotainment system. The cool-looking hexagonal steering wheel features buttons at each side for controlling the turn signals, headlights, and horn.

Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga

Development of the Bohema remains ongoing, with additional track testing taking place in the UK, Europe, the Middle East, and Praga's home circuit, the Slovakia Ring.

Production is due to get underway in the second half of next year, though just 10 examples are planned for 2023. Approximately 20 cars per year will be hand-built over the next four years. All told, Praga says 89 vehicles will be produced.

A global client and specification center will open its doors in the UK next year, as well as a track and customer delivery programs. According to the latest exchange rates, pricing is estimated to begin at about $1.3 million.

Praga
Praga
Praga
Praga

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