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$10 Million Ferrari ALMOST Stole The Show Last Weekend

Auction / 2 Comments

Ferris Bueller would approve.

Few automotive rivalries – on or off the track – are as legendary, or as heated, as the battle between Ferrari and McLaren. And Ferrari more often than not wins. But not this time.

During the auctions at Pebble Beach this year, a rare McLaren F1 sold for a massive $19.8 million – a little lower than expected, but still enough to clinch the record for that model and eclipse anything else to cross the block in Monterey this year. And it took that much to outshine the classic Ferrari you see here.

Matthieu Heurtault for Gooding & Company
Matthieu Heurtault for Gooding & Company
Matthieu Heurtault for Gooding & Company
Matthieu Heurtault for Gooding & Company
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It's a highly sought-after 1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider, not unlike the one immortalized by Matthew Broderick in the cult classic "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." Only this one's silver (Grigio Vinovo, to be specific), not red, with brown leather interior.

The classic convertible Prancing Horse is one of just 106 made, and just 50 in the original long-wheelbase form. Chassis number 1055 GT was only the 11th California Spider made, and features those most desirable covered headlights. And though it was designed as a road car, it even has some racing pedigree, having competed in SCCA events in Florida back in '62.

Jensen Sutta for Gooding & Company
Jensen Sutta for Gooding & Company

The California was consigned to Gooding & Company – arch rival to RM Sotheby's that sold the McLaren – and when bidding was done, it sold for $9.905 million. That was also less than its pre-sale estimate range of $11-13 million, but it was still higher than any other car sold in Monterey this week... save, once again, for the aforementioned McLaren.

The same auction also saw another convertible 250 GT – a '58 Series I Cabriolet – sell for $6.8 million, and Niki Lauda's '75 312T for $6 million, helping Gooding achieve over $76 million in sales across the two-day event.

Matthieu Heurtault for Gooding & Company
Matthieu Heurtault for Gooding & Company
Mike Maez for Gooding & Company
Marcel Massini for Gooding & Company

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