200-MPH Aston Martin Bertone Wagon Up For Sale

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If you buy it, the seller will even give you the tooling to build another one.

How would you like the chance to own a one-of-one Aston Martin that was styled by legendary Italian coachbuilder Bertone? Well, such a car is now up for sale and it could be yours. You may remember the Aston Martin Jet 2 Shooting Brake Concept, which was built back in 2009 and based on the DB9. The car never included an engine and was simply a shell but it inspired British motoringenthusiast Barry Weir to commission his own version based on the Aston Martin Rapide.

Dubbed, the Aston Martin Jet 2+2, this fabulous creation was a one-off that reportedly cost $4 million to build. Bertone intended to build ten of them but the company went bankrupt before it ever got the chance.

Barry Weir
Barry Weir
Barry Weir

Not only is the Jet 2+2 a one-of-a-kind Aston Martin, but it is also the last car Bertone ever built. Just keep adding zeros to that check. The car uses the same 5.9-liter engine found in the standard Rapide, so expect 470 horsepower coupled with the angelic song of twelve cylinders arranged in a V formation.

Weir presumed that the tooling for the car was lost forever when Bertone went bankrupt but earlier this year, he managed to find the fiberglass molds and full-sized clay model in an Italian auction while browsing on the internet. "Now we have the molds, the clay model, the number plate, and the finished car. I'm minded to sell the complete package and the buyer can choose what they wish to do with it," Weir says. "They could reproduce the car with the molds and model or, alternatively, have it as a one-off production car, which is registered as Aston Martin Jet 2 - which is a new model."

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Barry Weir
Barry Weir
Barry Weir
Barry Weir

"Part of me would love to see it reproduced but another part likes the idea that it remains a unique one-off as part of automobile and Aston Martin history," he added.

The car took three-and-a-half months to build as Bertone scanned the car, created reverse molds, and beat the panels by hand out of aluminum, sheet metal, and carbon fiber. Bertone managed to keep the weight nearly identical to the stock Rapide, so performance wasn't impacted.

"It was a halo car for Aston Martin," said Weir says. "At the time, it was the fastest shooting brake in the world at 200 mph, reaching 60 mph in about 5.3 seconds."

This is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to own a piece of British and Italian motoring history and we have no doubt the car will sell for an impressive sum.

Barry Weir
Barry Weir
Barry Weir
Barry Weir

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