5 Obscure Records Only Lamborghini Could Break

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Here are the legendary Lambos whose achievements you've probably never heard of.

Automobili Lamborghini is a brand that likes to show off - just look at the new Countach if you don't believe us. Besides the outrageous bodywork of almost any modern Lambo, the company likes to brag in other ways too. Recently, the Italian automaker has told us all about the Aventador's greatest innovations and has also listed the ways in which it is helping save the planet. Other pieces have focused on things like the one-make Super Trofeo series, and now the latest bit from Sant'Agata explains five of the automaker's records that you may not have heard of before.

Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini

Gandini's Glassy Outlook

The first record pertains to the Marzal, which featured an interior entirely upholstered in silver-colored leather and extreme use of the hexagon shape in as many details as possible, including the dashboard, the rear window, and in the console cutout. That's all very cool and typical of what designers of the time imagined a futuristic car to look like, but the record comes from a more ridiculous feature of the car, namely a glass surface covering 4.5 square meters (48.4 square feet), extending from the gullwing doors to the roof. That makes the Marcello Gandini-designed Marzal "a fully operational show car with the largest glass surface in history."

Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini
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The Miura Was Designed By Toddlers

Okay, that's not quite accurate, but in relative terms for Lamborghini, it was. See, the Miura was designed by the youngest team in company history, with an average age of just 29. This was Ferruccio Lamborghini's decision, as he wanted to use "brilliant and capable young people" so that he could better challenge the competition, specifically Ferrari. Thus, he hired and collaborated with talented individuals from universities and the professional space.

In 1966, the team that brought the Miura to life was made up of designer Marcello Gandini and test driver Bob Wallace (both aged just 28), and the 30-year-old pair of chief engineer Gian Paolo Dallara and assistant engineer Paolo Stanzani. Not only was the Miura a spectacular success, but all of these men went on to become "masters in their respective fields in the automotive world", as Lamborghini succinctly puts it (and we agree with). Ferruccio clearly knew what he was doing with the young upstarts.

Lamborghini
Lamborghini

The Miura Was Slammed

That new Countach we mentioned at the outset? It's just 44.8 inches tall and surprisingly pretty for having to bow to modern safety laws. In the '60s, a time in which arguably the most beautiful cars ever sculpted captured the imagination of all who saw them, "low height and sinuous, aerodynamic forms were the most important aspects in the minds of designers developing a sports car." As a result, the Miura was just 105.5 centimeters in height. That's just 41.5 inches, so if you have to bend yourself in half to access the new Countach, you'd have to crawl to get into the Miura, the record-holder for the lowest mass-produced car ever.

Lamborghini
Lamborghini

Lamborghini Pioneered The Super SUV

Long before the Urus came on the scene, Lamborghini was trying to get a military contract to help pay for more supercars. However, the short story is that the vehicle proposed for the military ended up being marketed as a regular car, seeing many changes along the way. In any case, the truck that was meant for the army became the LM002, which was first unveiled at the Brussels Motor Show in 1986. With a 5.2-liter engine producing 450 horsepower and "excellent off-roading capabilities", thanks to a two-speed transfer case with a center-locking diff, AWD, and a light body made of aluminum and fiberglass, the LM002 could scale slopes of up to 50 degrees.

While the Humvee has Schwarzenegger, the first super SUV's famous owners included Arnold's greatest foe in Sylvester Stallone, as well as the likes of Mike Tyson, Tina Turner, and, er, Pablo Escobar.

Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini

Those Scissor Doors, Of Course

It's damn near impossible to talk about a Lamborghini without mentioning the Countach, and you certainly can't talk about a Countach without taking a moment to appreciate those spectacular scissor doors. The Countach was another Marcello Gandini design, and the man just knew what he was doing. Fully aware that seeing out of the Countach would be tricky, the scissor doors were fitted to intentionally aid a driver in backing up and parking, although the dramatic effect of opening them was surely a big cause for excitement. These doors still turn heads today, so imagine what they must have looked like back in 1971.

The Countach was the first production car with these doors, and the feature carried over to its successor in the Diablo, and then the Murcielago, Reventon, Veneno, Centenario, and Aventador.

So there you have it: five Lamborghini records and world-firsts you may not have known about. We can't wait to see how the most outrageous brand in history continues to wow us, especially when the Countach turns 100, half a century from now.

Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini

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