A Unique Porsche 935 Just Sold For $1.5 Million

Industry News / Comments

One with zero miles on the clock just sold for double its original value.

The original Porsche 935 is one of the ultimate racecars for enthusiasts of the brand. Some would put it up there with the legendary 917, and its "slantnose" front end has become iconic. And in case you missed it, Porsche created a modern version of this historic car, but with the underpinnings of the incredible GT2 RS. In addition to a 700 horsepower twin-turbo flat-six, the modern 935 is also clad in a carbon fiber-reinforced body. Just 77 were made at a price of around $800,000. Right out of the gate, it's far out of reach even fore most millionaires. But it's likely that its starting price may be the cheapest valuation it ever gets.

For instance, the second unit ever produced just sold for almost double its original selling price.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

It's a fabulous machine, and interestingly enough, predictions that we reported earlier this month have now come true, with this track-only, Martini-liveried, zero-mile 935 fetching €1,320,000 - or a little over $1.48 million at today's exchange rate. The car is reported to have been delivered to its commissioner in February, but the Monaco-based collector is clearly more of a businessman than a gearhead.

Despite having the car for a few months, the owner hasn't even taken it for one short burst around a track. The protective wrapping over the gear-lever is even untouched. Does that make it worth the selling price? Probably, but it hurts to think that a car built to be the ultimate modern track racer in a classic suit has never been driven in anger even once.

Everything You Need To Know About The Nissan 400Z
Everything You Need To Know About The Nissan 400Z
Best Cars For City Driving In 2020
Best Cars For City Driving In 2020
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

Of course, when you can get on a list that lets you buy one of 77 special editions, you probably can have fun in less valuable yet still ridiculously expensive metal, but this car was clearly bought exclusively for profit. We've seen cars go for insane amounts of money before - a Ferrari Enzo recently set a world record at RM Sotheby's - but at least that car and most like it have been driven and enjoyed at some point. On the other hand, a car as rare as this is certainly something we'd like to see preserved, and a messy crash would definitely ruin our mood.

What do you think? Should a car's value be more important than its purpose? If not, we'd love to take your 935 for a spin.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
Source Credits: Motor Authority

Join The Discussion