Alvis Name Returns With New $430,000 Car

Classic Cars / 2 Comments

The Graber Super Coupe continuation car will be its first offering.

Unless you're a 70-something automotive enthusiast, you likely have no idea what Alvis is. It's not a subsidiary of the famous rental car company, but rather a Bentley-like British manufacturer that went bust in 1967.

After finishing his evergreen gift to the world (the original Mini), Sir Alec Issigonis went over to Alvis and created a V8 saloon. Unfortunately, Rover took control of Alvis, and it eventually ended up as part of British Leyland. The political troubles of the Leyland era killed it. Now Alvis has been revived, and it is building a series of continuation cars.

Continuation cars are big business at the moment. We recently compiled a list of the nine best examples out there. You can even get a road-legal F1 car from 1957.

Alvis Car Company
Alvis Car Company
Alvis Car Company

The first Alvis to be introduced is the Graber Super Coupe. The Super Coupe was a pretty advanced design at the time, and Alvis is sticking to the original plans. That means an all-aluminum body and new chassis based on the old design. Each one will be a hand-built bespoke car, built using the initial concept sketches. It's essentially the same tactic Jaguar used to construct the C-Type continuation car.

Alvis is updating the engine, however. It's a 3.0-liter straight-six engine based on the authentic engine block. The original carburetor design has been ditched in favor of fuel injection. The engine also runs a higher compression ratio, made possible by modern digital machining.

The new engine produces 172 horsepower and 209 lb-ft of torque, 42 hp more than the original.

Alvis Car Company
Alvis Car Company
Alvis Car Company
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Alvis' claimed performance figures aren't mind-blowing, however. It claims the Super Coupe will get to 60 mph in 8.9 seconds. There is no claimed top speed. Not that it matters because this car was never meant to be about speed. Think of it as a Singer but without the speed. It's more of a style statement that's easier to drive than the original.

The interior is still very much hand-crafted, as is the rest of the car. It may be modern in all the right places, but the manufacturing process is still as labor-intensive as in Alvis' glory days.

We think the joy of this car lies in the attention to detail and the naturally-aspirated six-cylinder engine. You simply roll the window down and enjoy the ride while listening to the almost inaudible rumble of the six-cylinder engine.

Alvis Car Company
Alvis Car Company
Alvis Car Company

It's not a first, second, or third car. It appears Alvis designed this car to be used on those occasions where the simple act of driving is the goal.

After this initial run of Super Coupes is finished, Alvis will move on to the Park Ward Drophead and the Vanden Plas Tourer and Bertelli Coupe. The manufacturing methods will stay the same.

If you're interested, you need to be one of the ten percent. Pricing for the Super Coupe starts at $437,000. That's more than twice what you pay for a Bentley Continental GT V8. Still, as far as continuation cars go, the Super Coupe is on the affordable side. If you want the Aston Martin DB5 from the Bond film Goldfinger, you have to pay Aston a cool $3.5 million.

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