Sales

AMG Selling Such An Absurd Number Of Cars Nobody Can Keep Up

This isn’t war, this is outright domination.

The evolution of the AMG tuning wing has been nothing short of impressive. After signing on with Mercedes in 1993, it’s morphed into its own performance brand with more success than it's founders envisioned. Once specializing in offering speed-seekers the option of Mercedes coupes, sedans, and roadsters with downright scary amounts of power, AMG has used the last few years to expand into the supercar territory with the AMG GT and then crank out “AMG lite” models for those on the opposite end of the income spectrum.

“Clearly, this is being rewarded,” said AMG boss Tobias Moers to Australia’s Car Advice. “In 2016, we achieved record sales figures of almost 100,000 units. And in our anniversary year, we again managed a lightning start – with double-digit growth rates in the first quarter. That makes us pretty optimistic for the rest of 2017. Our aim is to clearly pass the 100,000 mark.” AMG’s trajectory sure looks like it’s headed that way. In 2016, it came just shy of the hundred grand mark, moving 99,235 AMG-badged Mercedes into new garages. That alone represents a 44.1% spike in growth, and all of AMG's stars seem to be aligning to make its 50th anniversary year the one that slingshots it into the six-figure sales mark.

Already, it’s expanded production of its hand built engines, is emulating rabbits during mating season by multiplying its lineup, and is even constructing compact AMG bait to lull in customers with less disposable income. And that’s in addition to its existing lineup. “We offer our customers the most comprehensive product portfolio of all time, with more than 50 different models ranging from the A-Class right up to the S-Class,” says Moers. “There has been strong demand for our ’43’ models, for example, which are aimed at new target groups. The same applies to our compact ’45’ models.” Save for another economic crash or all-out nuclear war, it seems like nothing can stop AMG’s stampede. Not even tough fuel economy standards.

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