Aston Martin Designers Show How To Draw The Valkyrie And Vantage

Design / Comments

There are designers, and then there are designers.

With everyone stuck at home social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic, automakers have been encouraging us to get creative during our spare time. Audi, for example, let us unleash our inner-child by releasing a free digital coloring book featuring the Q7, A6, and R8. Infiniti, on the other hand, helped ease the boredom with its unique "Carigami" campaign letting fans craft origami versions of the Infiniti Q50, QX80, and FX.

And now Aston Martin has launched a series of tutorial videos showing you how to sketch your own Aston Martin supercar. In the first episode, Aston Martin's exterior designer Sam Holgate shows how to draw the Vantage while giving an insight into the car's design.

Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin
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With the car's athletic proportions and prominent shoulder line - taken from the previous generation Vantage - that runs from the front to the back of the car sketched out, it doesn't take long before the silhouette starts to resemble the bold grand touring car we know today.

The designer then sketches the Vantage's distinctive nose and s-curved grille that runs into the front splitter, which was inspired by the Vulcan track car, as well as the signature ducktail at the back that gives the Vantage a dynamic stance, making it appear to be moving even when it's stationary. "We try and think of our cars as different characters to help differentiate them," Holgate explained. He went on to explain how the Vantage was "always thought of as a hunter right from the early stage of the design process."

Aston Martin
Aston Martin

On average, it takes around three to five years for the design to evolve from a sketch to a production car according to Holgate. In a second video lead designer Antonino Lo Re shows how to sketch the design of the upcoming Valkyrie hypercar. Optimizing the aerodynamics was a key focus when designing the Valkyrie, which is why the Valkyrie's cockpit is shaped like a teardrop.

"The initial idea was to design something closer to a spaceship," said Lo Re. The designer then shows how intersecting the teardrop with a discus makes the upper section of the Valkyrie look like a UFO. As the sketch evolves, the wraparound windshield is added to improve airflow around the cabin along with the F1-derived front wing, extreme rear wing, and lots of exposed carbon.

Aston Martin
Aston Martin

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