Aston Martin Valkyrie Has Been Delayed (Again)

Supercars / Comments

What's the problem now? Read on.

Only one month ago we were told the first Aston Martin Valkyrie customer car had been completed and production of the ultra-limited hypercar was in full swing. Deliveries were set to get underway in the coming weeks. That may or may not happen now.

Bloomberg reports the $3.2 million Valkyrie has suffered yet another delay, this time regarding its electrical systems. Aston Martin sources have confirmed this to be the case. A company spokesperson added not a single Valkyrie has been handed over to a buyer yet but hopes "double-digit" deliveries will begin later this month. "The first customer car has completed its shakedown, with documentation now being prepared for delivery in the next few days," the company said in a statement.

Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin

Only 150 coupes are set to be built (all are sold out) along with an additional 85 Spiders and 40 track-only Valkyrie AMR Pro models. It's been a long road to production for the Valkyrie, which first premiered back in 2016 in concept form. It's an extremely complicated machine and Aston Martin has faced many challenges preparing it for production.

Power comes from a Cosworth-developed naturally aspirated 6.5-liter V12 paired to an electric motor. Total output comes to 1,139 horsepower with curb weight reaching only around 2,300 pounds. The Valkyrie is not only a symbolic show of technology and brand commitment, but it's also a major moneymaker.

Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin
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Analysts estimate each Valkyrie sale is the equivalent of 21 Vantage V8s being sold. That high profit margin comes at a price, however. Company CEO Tobias Moers recently compared Valkyrie production to building an F1 car. "It's the most complex car I ever saw in my life to assemble."

Along with the DBX, the Valkyrie program is vital to Aston Martin's financial recovery. This latest and hopefully final delay probably won't anger customers too much but we can imagine that their patience may be running out. They've waited long enough, despite the car's complexities, and have paid good money for what's said to be the closest thing to an actual F1 car. The also-delayed Mercedes-AMG ONE and its German creators will probably disagree with that.

Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Aston Martin
Source Credits: Bloomberg

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