BMW Has Made A Massive Decision About Its Munich Plant

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The Bavarian automaker's EV push reaches a new level.

BMW, like so many others, is pushing ahead with electrification as quickly as possible. The Bavarian automaker intends to release at least four new electric models in the coming years, and if the BMW i4 is anything to go by, they'll be brilliant. At the same time, the company has continued development on hydrogen vehicles like the iX5, but its latest announcement shows that EVs are certainly where its main focus lies. Over the weekend, the BMW Group announced that its Munich plant has gone fully electric and has just completed its first series-produced i4. This is the first step in the production plant's goal to turn at least half of its output into electrified vehicles by 2023.

BMW
BMW
BMW
BMW

"For the plant and the team, the launch of the BMW i4 is a milestone on the road to electric mobility," says BMW AG's Milan Nedeljkovic. "By 2023, more than half of all vehicles from our Munich facility will have an electrified drive. The majority will be fully electric. So Munich goes fully electric."

This production plant has been around for almost a century, so adapting it to the needs of electrified vehicle production was challenging, but the results have been worth the efforts, as the plant's director, Peter Weber, explains: "We succeeded in integrating the new vehicle into our existing systems without halting production. The team and our partners did an amazing job."

BMW
BMW
BMW
BMW

The plant doesn't just build green cars, it does so in a green way too. BMW has continually reduced its resource consumption over the years, reducing this by more than half in the time between 2006 and 2020. CO2 emissions have dropped even further, by 78%, but BMW isn't stopping there. It aims to reduce CO2 emissions per vehicle by a further 80% before 2030 rolls around and has implemented new measures like a reverse osmosis system that treats water from the cathodic dip - the bath where the base coat is applied to a vehicle - so that it can be reused for the same stage of the process. This is expected to reduce freshwater consumption by more than six million liters a year. Nicely done, BMW.

BMW
BMW
BMW
BMW

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