Cadillac Has Something To Say About Coupes

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The Cadillac ATS Coupe and ATS-V Coupe (and sedans) are dead. That's nothing new but it's still not particularly enjoyable to hear. GM's luxury brand has had a long history with both these body styles. However, the coupe has become, more or less, a niche body style that cannot be relied upon to earn a profit. Sedans are also somewhat problematic in the era of crossovers, but the arrival of the new Cadillac CT4 and Cadillac CT5 are proof the brand is committed to traditional four-doors for the foreseeable future.

However, the death of Cadillac coupes could be greatly over-exaggerated. Cadillac Society spoke to Cadillac president Steve Carlisle about this topic and he gave a hopeful answer regarding the potential return of a coupe.

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Cadillac

"Never is a long time," Carlisle said. "The way I look at it, body styles go through cycles, roughly every ten years. But with electrification, the architecture is so different, it opens up opportunities for different things. And people will be looking for something new and different than what's on stage [the 2021 Cadillac Escalade]. I'm 100 percent confident of that. So we'll continue to explore the perimeters of what may be the next thing."

It's important to remember Cadillac remains committed to an all-electric future. Even the all-new Cadillac Escalade will reportedly offer an all-electric powertrain option in the relatively near future. As for what a future Cadillac EV coupe could be like, Carlisle made something else quite clear: "We're not going to do what's already been done. We're going to do something different."

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Cadillac

The last time Cadillac attempted an eco-friendly coupe was the Chevy Volt-based ELR. Perhaps the main reason why the ELR failed to catch on was the fact it was overpriced. Cadillac thought buyers would be willing to pay around $70,000 for a heavily re-skinned first-generation Volt. They figured wrong.

If Cadillac does ever return to the coupe segment, rest assured it's learned some ELR lessons. But, above all, a potential new coupe must break into some new territory. It appears Carlisle clearly understands this.

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Cadillac
Source Credits: Cadillac Society

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