Can Italy's New Cop Car Survive An AK-47 Attack?

Police

We wouldn't be worried if this pulled us over.

Most police cars are big, powerful, strong and reliable. The Dodge Charger fits the bill, as does the Ford Interceptor sedan and Chevrolet Caprice Patrol. The Italian police however have a new plan, one that involves turning their entire police fleet into modified compact family cars. That car, the Seat Leon, is described by Seat as the “best small family car.” We can’t say that’s the most intimidating description, especially with the largest engine being a 2.0-liter TDI. That won't be terribly good for chasing down culprits.

We have to give Seat some credit though. The wagon has bulletproof armor and a slew of other nifty features. Overall, the Leon may actually be qualified to be the new cruiser

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