Crash Test Shows Scary Difference Between Cheap Cars And REALLY Cheap Cars

Industry News / Comments

Thankfully, America doesn't get any "really" cheap cars.

America still gets a few entry-level vehicles priced for buyers who just want basic transportation. The 2022 Hyundai Accent, starting at $16,645, springs to mind. But even the humble Accent pales in comparison with vehicles sold in markets with looser crash test standards. Just look at the Nissan Sakura; it's electric, but only costs a bit more than the Accent. We may envy these entry-level cars for their affordability, but there's a reason why automakers can get away with selling them for so little: safety (or lack thereof).

Global NCAP (New Car Assessment Program) decided to demonstrate the widely varying crash standards that exist between various countries. To show these stark difference, the program crashed a Mexican market Hyundai Grand i10 sedan into a US market Accent.

Global NCAP / YouTube
Global NCAP / YouTube
Global NCAP / YouTube

Though both cars are the least expensive Hyundai models available in their respective markets, the Accent offers far superior safety features including six standard airbags and electronic stability control (ESC). As for the i10, which is sold across Latin America, it only gets two frontal airbags. It's worth noting the Accent is actually built in Mexico, but the Mexican market i10 is built in India.

The Global NCAP lined up the Hyundai Accent head-to-head with the i10 for a frontal collision test. After the two cars crashed into each other, the organization analyzed the results to see how the occupants would have faired. The scary differences are a literally matter of life and death.

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Global NCAP / YouTube
Global NCAP / YouTube
Global NCAP / YouTube

The Hyundai Accent offered good protection for its occupants and the body shell showed an overall stable structure. All six airbags deployed, protecting any passengers inside. It's likely that anyone riding inside the Accent would have walked away with minor injuries. In contrast, the i10 showed an unstable structure; the body shell buckled, the A-pillar was bent, and the steering wheel was substantially pushed back towards the driver. With only two airbags on board, the occupants would likely receive serious or even fatal injuries according to Global NCAP data. So the next time you rent a basic economy car on vacation, just remember that not all crash testing standards in the world are equal.

Global NCAP / YouTube
Global NCAP / YouTube

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