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Crash-Testing The Rimac C_Two Will Make You Cringe

Supercar / 6 Comments

That's a lot of very expensive circuitry to be slamming into a wall.

Crash testing is an unfortunate necessity in the automotive industry. Somewhat less unfortunate when crash-testing a mass-market econobox than, say, a six- or seven-figure exotic supercar – but necessary nonetheless. And one of the manufacturers currently feeling that pain, as you can see from this latest video, is Rimac.

The Croatian company run by Mate Rimac is the outfit behind the Concept_One and the new C_Two – all-electric hypercars that have caught the attention of major automakers like Porsche, Audi, Hyundai, and the new electric-vehicle offshoot of the famed design house Pininfarina.

via Rimac
via Rimac
via Rimac
via Rimac
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Like any other automaker, Rimac has to crash-test its exotic electric hypercars in order to get them approved for sale and use on public roadways. But as we reported a few months ago, Rimac isn't just doing the bare minimum to get the rubber stamp.

Though it's only going to build 150 of them for public consumption, the manufacturer is undertaking to crash-test some 30 C_Twos to make sure they're as safe as can be. With each example anticipated to sell for upwards of $2 million, that's roughly $60 million worth of cars it's going to obliterate in the name of safety.

Rimac via YouTube
Rimac via YouTube
Rimac via YouTube
Rimac via YouTube

As you can see from the footage, it's already gotten down to work on that process, apparently using a crash-test facility belonging to German mega-supplier (and tire manufacturer) Continental AG to put its chassis and all the components contained therein to the test.

The Rimac C_Two – its final production name still to be announced – packs 1,888 horsepower's worth of electric motors, propelling it to 62 in as little as 1.85 seconds while being able to travel a good 400 miles on a single charge. And apparently it'll be safe, too, in the event that all its performance potential proves a bit too much for its driver.

via Rimac
via Rimac
via Rimac
via Rimac
via Rimac
via Rimac

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