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EXCLUSIVE: McLaren Denies Potential Apple Takeover

We reach out to McLaren and come back with some interesting insights.

Earlier today, the Internet was set ablaze when it was reported that Apple could be on the verge of buying McLaren. Apparently, the tech company wasn’t just in talks to buy the automaker, it wanted to buy the entire McLaren Technology Group, which houses the automaker, an F1 team, and an applied technologies group. Enthusiasts didn’t know what to think, so we reached out and spoke with Wayne Bruce, the Global Communications Director at McLaren to see what all the noise was about.

Bruce outright denied the claims, saying, “we are not in talks with Apple.” Whether or not Bruce’s statement is true or just a way of covering up a secret that McLaren doesn’t want to be leaked is left unknown. Despite having McLaren shoot down the story, Financial Times, the outlet behind the leak, remains firm in its claims. Upon hearing the news of the British supercar manufacturer’s denial, Tim Bradshaw, a reporter for FT, said, “Obviously we stand by our story despite McLaren’s statement.” While we likely won’t know the truth without the passage of a bit more time, let’s assume that the deal is on. Apple, a company valued at $641 billion, wants to buy a company that’s been valued at $1.3-1.95 billion.

As a tech giant, Apple has an obvious interest in McLaren Technology Group’s research, patents, and inventions. While the McLaren Applied Technologies sector of the company has its heart in research for its Formula One racing team, it also delves into a few other sectors that Apple may find interesting. Biotelemetry, or the measuring of human and animal physiological functions at a distance, is one avenue that might tickle Apple’s fancy, as is MAT’s expertise in data management and simulation techniques that are even applied to make some of the world’s busiest airports more efficient. Of course, the more interesting proposition would be that Apple is buying the company to acquire the vast knowledge it possesses in making cars.

That would be used to build the famous Apple Car. While Apple’s rumored Titan project has yet to unveil a vehicle fit for production, the tech giant could benefit from McLaren’s expertise with electric motors and hybrid drivetrains or even biotelemetry (useful for checking in on a driver). Furthermore, using the lessons learned from helping to make airports more efficient, Apple could be looking to McLaren to help develop software for self-driving cars that can communicate with each other and alleviate traffic. All of this is a bit of a long shot, but with Apple's imaginative ways, you never know. If the rumors are true, then things could take a radical direction for both companies. If not, at least we still get the upcoming 650S successor.

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