Feds Slap Flo-Pro And Thunder Diesel With $1.6 Million Fine

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The EPA is clamping down hard on emissions defeat devices violating Clean Air Act.

Flo-Pro Performance Exhaust and Thunder Diesel & Performance Company have agreed to pay $1.6 million to resolve allegations that they violated the Clean Air Act (CAA). These companies sold third-party devices that bypass or disable vehicle emissions control systems. These devices were quite popular amongst the Ford F-450 and Ram Heavy Duty crowd. This is also not the first time the Feds have gone after coal rollers.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the above is classified as "defeat devices," which are prohibited by the CAA. These devices are similar to VW's infamous cheat devices, though they don't operate only under emissions testing conditions. VW's sentence was not as light, with VAG having to pay out millions on both a federal and state level.

"The exhaust from diesel pickup trucks equipped to operate without essential emissions controls causes severe harm to our nation's air quality," said acting assistant administrator Larry Starfield for EPA's Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance.

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"Defeat devices violate Clean Air Act emissions requirements meant to protect public health and the environment, as well as vulnerable communities that are disproportionately impacted by air pollution," said Assistant Attorney General Todd Kim of the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division (ENRD). "This settlement ensures that Flo~Pro will stop the sale of all defeat devices in the U.S. and is the latest reminder that the Department of Justice will hold the aftermarket automotive parts industry accountable for violations of federal anti-pollution laws."

Flo~Pro is still operating, but it has agreed to stop manufacturing and selling devices that "bypass, defeat, or render inoperative EPA-approved emission controls and harm air quality." Thunder Diesel has since gone out of business, even though both companies received a reduced penalty after proving their unfortunate financial circumstances.

Both companies must also inform customers who purchased these parts that they violate the CAA. Finally, they can no longer provide technical support or honor warranty claims for these devices.

"This settlement will improve public health and prevent substantial amounts of air pollution in the future, as the installation of defeat devices prevents emission controls from working properly."

According to the EPA, "stopping the manufacture, sale, and installation of defeat devices on vehicles and engines used on public roads as well as on non-road vehicles and engines is a priority."

"This settlement will improve public health and prevent substantial amounts of air pollution in the future, as the installation of defeat devices prevents emission controls from working properly. Tampering with diesel-powered vehicles by installing defeat devices causes large amounts of nitrogen oxide and particulate matter emissions, contributing to serious public health problems. These include premature death, aggravation of the respiratory and cardiovascular disease, aggravation of existing asthma, acute respiratory symptoms, chronic bronchitis, and decreased lung function," the EPA said in a statement.

These devices were sold between 2016 to 2019, and the EPA estimates that the result has been more than 775 million pounds of excess nitrogen and 6.7 million pounds of extra particular matter being released into the air.

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