Ferrari To Increase Sales By Building More Special Edition Supercars

Supercar

This is good news if you were one of the many who couldn’t get their hands on a LaFerrari Aperta.

Ferrari is dead set against building an SUV to boost profits, but as a publicly traded company no longer under the wing of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, it has the responsibility to continue its growth in order to keep stockholders happy. Not that they aren’t, though, especially when considering that the Italian automaker managed to break a sales record in 2016 thanks to a 38 percent surge in fourth quarter sales. So how does Ferrari expect to keep up momentum?

According to Bloomberg, by building more cars like the LaFerrari Aperta. Last year’s jump was helped by selling all 200 units of the hybrid convertible, but Ferrari has recently outlined a goal to increase profit by a minimum of 8 percent this year and put itself on track to building 9,000 cars per year by 2019, up from 8,014 vehicles it sold in 2016. That means that 2017 will be a crucial year for Ferrari, which hopes to sell 8,400 vehicles this year in order to bring in 950 million Euros ($1.02 billion) of revenue in 2017, topping the 880 million Euros ($947 million) in revenue it saw in 2016. Ferrari, which usually prides itself on ensuring that its supply of supercars is lower than demand, will gradually expand production of its special edition vehicles in order to meet this goal.

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“Ferrari NV plans to increase profit by at least 8 percent this year with more special-edition supercars such as the $2.1 million LaFerrari Aperta, which helped revenue and earnings reach records in 2016,” claimed the report. To us, this seems like a plausible goal for Ferrari, especially when considering that it has 70 unique liveries it plans to sell for each of its five models during 2017 in order to celebrate its 70th anniversary. We’re sure these 350 Ferrari models will carry a premium that collectors will be more than happy to pay. Unlike Ferrari’s competitor McLaren, the Italian automaker does not want to delve lower into the price bracket to sell more cars, meaning that it’s strategy is simply to make the rich buy more of its cars. Good luck, Ferrari.

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