Ferrari's New Hypercar Racer Sounds Like Growling Demons

Spy Shots / 2 Comments

Let's just hope it performs better than its F1 brethren.

The Le Mans Hypercar class is going to be one for the motorsport ages. What was just a year ago a nearly gutted, overly-hyped motorsport class is set to be substantially much more, backed by big brands and big money. Over the last few weeks and months, OEM brand's new Hypercar entrants are trickling out.

Now, we're getting a look at Ferrari's effort. From the looks and sounds of things, this won't be like anything Ferrari has made before it. It'll be a more significant departure from the brand's norm, even than the 296 GTB was. The ultimate goal here is to make a run at Toyota's Le Mans dominance next year at the 100th running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans race.

Ferrari
Ferrari
Varryx/YouTube
Varryx/YouTube

Really, we're just here to see the car. All cars should be sitting at roughly the same spec. How teams get there, however, is a much different story. Take Cadillac for example. The brand's Le Mans entrant uses a 5.5-liter V8 to meet class regulations. BMW will also use a V8 for its entrant. What we do know is that all cars in the class must make less than 670 hp and weigh less than 2,270 lbs. Of course, Ferrari is handling this like Ferrari with a teaser image and sparse information.

"Being able to touch the result of many months of work, planning, and simulations gives us new energy and motivation. We are proud of what we have achieved, and although the LMH's masking during testing hides the car's volumes and styling, I think it is undeniably recognizable as a Ferrari," said Antonello Coletta, Head of Ferrari Attivita Sportive GT.

Varryx/YouTube
Varryx/YouTube
Varryx/YouTube

We did try to brighten up Ferrari's teaser pic, in addition to the video provided to give a more precise view of the new hypercar. Much like Caddy's, the business end is at the back, with a massive raked diffuser and an even bigger wing. The dual-wing design is an interesting take and an aero move we haven't seen yet.

The front of the car looks much more like a Le Mans car you'd see on the grid today. There's a massive splitter on the front, and a sculpted body to direct air towards the back of the car. Visibility certainly looks a lot better than many current LMP cars as well.

Predictably, it sounds absolutely wild. The transmission has that sequential-like "bark" you'd normally associate with a single-clutch Lambo or a rally car, and the exhaust is almost certainly from a V8. We hear turbos in action too, and all cars in this class will use a mild-hybrid system. Ferrari will likely have more juicy details for us very soon.

Varryx/YouTube
Varryx/YouTube
Varryx/YouTube
Varryx/YouTube

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