Franken-Porsche 911 Turbo S Was Brought Back From The Dead

Sports Cars / Comments

It took 100 hours just to make it look like a 911 Turbo again.

What happens to a car after it gets totaled? Unless it's a super-rare, limited-run supercar, the answer is most often: it's relegated to the scrapyard, where any saleable components are stripped off and sold to keep other cars of its kind on the road.

But so long as there are people as talented and nutty as Arthur Tussik left in the world, there's another way. Tussik is a master of auto body repair, who just revived a badly wrecked Type-991 Porsche 911 Turbo S by chopping, riveting, and welding on bits from two other donor Porsche's to create what can really only be described as a Franken-Porsche.

Arthur Tussik via YouTube
Arthur Tussik via YouTube
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The 911 Turbo S Tussik started with had serious damage at all four corners, so step one was to cut off the rear end of the car and weld in a replacement from a donor car. Next, he turned his attention to the front, cutting out and replacing everything ahead of the firewall. Both of these processes are works of art, with Tussik having to deal with a mix of welding, riveting, and gluing, with stamped parts made from both steel and aluminum.

It all looks absolutely exhausting. But with all that out of the way, at last, we start to see some of the Porsche's pretty outer panels start going back on, like the front fenders, spoiler, bumper covers, engine cover, and hood.

Arthur Tussik via YouTube
Arthur Tussik via YouTube

The end result is a mismatched harlequin Porsche with panels in white, gray, black, and blue, but were it not for that, you might never know that it was in such a terrible accident. The fit and finish is top-notch; all the panel gaps look spot on, there's sealant in all the appropriate spots, and Tussik made extensive use of a laser level to ensure the alignment is just right.

That's where we leave the car: in multiple colors, ready for a respray and a mechanical restoration. Tussik's work alone took 100 hours, and while that's a huge time sink, we like to think it was worth it to keep one more 911 Turbo S on the road.

Arthur Tussik via YouTube
Arthur Tussik via YouTube

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