Future Electric Porsches Will Come With Screaming Exhausts

Technology / Comments

The 'exhaust' system will make EVs sound fun.

Porsche has just taken the covers off its spectacular new 718 Cayman GT4 RS, and its induction noise is to die for. The 4.0-liter boxer motor borrowed from the 911 GT3 is a peach, and we can't get enough of it. However, as evidenced by the Mission R racer, the time of the combustion-engine sports car is fast drawing to a close, and the next 718 twins will be electric. For a company that trades on handling prowess and the driving experience, losing character in the latter criterion is something that we all fear. To try to get around this, Porsche has now developed an exhaust system for EVs that could feature on the next-gen Taycan and upcoming electric Macan. Allow us to explain.

CarBuzz
CarBuzz
CarBuzz
CarBuzz

CarBuzz has unearthed documents filed in Germany, in which Porsche says that the external background noise caused by electric motors is "unemotional" and "is dominated by the rolling noise of the tires." Of course, all EVs are required to have some sort of acoustic warning system to inform pedestrians of the proximity of the vehicle, and typically, these use loudspeakers placed behind the bumper. Stuttgart now wants to do things differently, because normal systems are "limited in volume and sound quality."

To overcome this, a new noise simulator inside a "resonance body" is being considered for development to make EVs louder and more aurally pleasing.

European Patent Office
European Patent Office
European Patent Office
European Patent Office
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Essentially, Porsche wants to make its future sound simulators more like real exhaust systems and would house the noise simulator inside a component that looks very similar to the axle-back exhaust box of a traditional car. This would be made from normal exhaust materials, presumably stainless steel, to help make the fake sound more akin to that of a real combustion engine.

With the sound outlet and resonance body working as a sound amplifier, Porsche aims to come "very close to the emotional character" of a regular car. It may seem like a silly gimmick, and we're well aware that this won't be anything as satisfying as a real exhaust system, but the closer we can get, the better.

European Patent Office
European Patent Office
European Patent Office
European Patent Office

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