Greatest Hits Of The 1980s And 1990s Head To Auction

Auctions / 12 Comments

We picked the five best cars on offer.

Ask any automotive enthusiast what era defines the supercar best, and you'll get 20 different answers.

Our theory is that it's a generational thing. The automotive aficionados who now have enough money to spend on ultra-expensive supercars experienced their formative years during the 1980s and 1990s. They've now been part of the workforce for 15 to 20 years and finally have the cash to splurge. Will they buy a brand-new Ferrari 296? Sure. Will they also spend an additional $3 million to have the real-life version of the Ferrari F40 they could only afford in poster format back in the day? Heck, yes.

We think that's why RM Sotheby's is hosting a first-of-its-kind auction in Miami, Florida, in December 2022. Only the 80s, 90s, and Modern Day supercars will be sold. Modern Day is included because of a few additions like the 2008 Mercedes-McLaren SLR Roadster, 2009 Bentley Azure, and a 2014 BMW M5.

Not necessarily supercars, but perfect for Miami, nevertheless. Here's a list of the top five cars that will be auctioned.

CarBuzz

1990 Ferrari F40

A list of seminal 80s/90s supercars would not be complete without what many consider to be the best of the lot. The F40 was built to celebrate 40 years of Ferrari production. Enzo Ferrari built several cars before the 125 S, but it was the first car to have his name pasted to the front. The F40 was also the last car Enzo signed off on.

This particular example belonged to Paul Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft. Allen knew how to live large. He retired from Microsoft in 2000 and spent the remaining 18 years of his life having fun. He gave billions to charity, bought several sports franchises, the world's biggest yacht, and this F40. He didn't use it much, as it only has 2,736 miles on the clock.

It will be sold with matching engine and gearbox numbers, a toolkit, owner's manuals, and three-piece Schedoni fitted luggage.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary by Bertone

The 25th Anniversary by Bertone was the most substantial facelift the Countach ever received. The car's details are not up on the website yet, but they're hardly necessary. Countach values are only going one way; it will be a million-dollar car by the decade's end.

The facelift, including subtle tweaks at the front and rear, and those radiator air intakes behind the front doors, were all made by a young man named Horacio Pagani. He started his career at Pagani, but he'd go on to do great things. You've probably heard of him...

Split-rim forged alloy OZ wheels were adopted for the Anniversario, a name still used today. As always, Pirelli delivered bespoke alloys.

Only 235 cars were delivered to the USA, all with fuel injection. Lamborghini offered a rear-wing delete option, but the original owner was smart enough not to tick that box.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

1990 Lamborghini LM002

It might seem odd to have two Lamborghini's on a list of the best 80s and 90s cars, but these two decades were known for excess. And nobody does excess better than Lamborghini, and no model has been more excessive or unnecessary than the Rambo Lambo. The Lamborghini Urus is considered a successor, but it isn't really. It's far too practical and fuel-efficient for that. Lamborghini had to equip the LM002 with a 45-gallon fuel tank so owners could go somewhere in it.

The LM002 started life as a military vehicle that used rear-mounted American-made V8s. The US military went in another direction, and you can now buy an EV based on the Humvee.

There will never be another car like the LM200H. Buying a V8 SUV or truck will likely be impossible by 2030, so a truck with the V12 from a Countach is too wild for even Lamborghini these days.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

1987 Mercedes-Benz 560 SEC AMG 6.0 Wide-Body

Mercedes-AMG recently stated that it will still produce its 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 engine as long as there's demand. Still, just the fact that it uses forced induction is already a big step away from how AMG used to do things before it was a subsidiary of Daimler.

The 6.0 Wide-Body is a case in point. Mercedes took the late 80s equivalent of the S-Class coupe and bored its V8 engine to six liters. The result was 385 horsepower and a top speed of 177 mph. Only 50 were built, and it's estimated that only 26 are currently available in the States.

AMG has always done things properly, which is why this isn't just an SEC with a bigger engine. It also has AMG brakes, model-specific wheels, a sportier AMG-tuned suspension, and a limited-slip differential.

But look at it for a second. It's a symphony of evil.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

1995 Porsche 928 GTS

The Porsche 928 made its debut in 1977 and was meant to replace the 911. Porsche fans took one look at the front-mounted engine and gave the car a hard pass, forcing Porsche to return to the drawing board.

Still, there was room for the 928 as a grand tourer, and over the years, it became more luxurious and powerful. In its final production year, Porsche introduced the 928 GTS with a 5.4-liter V8 under the hood, producing 345 hp. It was the most powerful, most expensive car in the range, which led to its downfall.

While the 928 was a great grand tourer, the 911 Turbo did the same job for much less. One of the 911's main selling points has always been everyday usability, which made the 928 irrelevant. Porsche has never gone down the front-mounted V8 coupe path since.

It's more alluring these days, especially since all but GT3 and GT3 RS models are turbocharged. The 928 GTS also looks much cooler nearly 20 years down the line.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

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