Editorial

Have High-Performance Supercars Finally Made Hybrids Cool?

Or will hybrids always be looked down on?

It seems like hybrid and electric cars have received an invigorating breath of fresh air recently. Just a few years ago, the word “hybrid” would bring about dreary images of the original Toyota Prius, while hybrids of today are most likely plastered on every enthusiast’s computer screen. Hybrids have come a long way from being hideous, underpowered and unloved machines to being on the cutting edge of what’s possible for high-powered supercars. And from the looks of it, hybrids are just getting started.

At this year’s Geneva Motor Show, automakers displayed some of the greatest, most incredible hybrid and electric cars ever made. And reports following the incredible motor show all point towards automakers continuing to create cars with hybrid technology. Instead of being anxious about the future of hybrid cars, enthusiasts should be welcoming this kind of technology with open arms for two very good reasons. The first is that modern supercars with hybrid powertrains are some of the quickest, fastest and craziest cars ever created. And we’re not just talking about the Holy Trinity here.

The Porsche 918 Spyder, Ferrari LaFerrari and McLaren P1 may have started the trend of supercars with hybrid powertrains, but other automakers have started to take notice. Take the Koenigsegg Regera for example. The Swedish hypercar makes other hybrid-powered supercars look like a modified Toyota Prius. The Regera uses a twin-turbo 5.0-liter V8 and three electric motors for a total of 1,500 hp and roughly 1,475 lb-ft of torque. The automaker claims the hypercar will be able to get to 60 mph in 2.8 seconds and 249 mph in 20 seconds. At $1.9 million a piece, the Regera is a hypercar with incredible numbers. What’s so good about the Regera? Well, it’s the future and that kind of technology will trickle down to regular sports cars.

It’s not just hybrids, but electric cars as well. The Tesla Model S P90D is a blisteringly quick sedan with the performance to embarrass some supercars, and other automakers are trying to catch up. Porsche is planning on putting an electric sedan on the market in 2020, with a hybrid sports car following suit. If Porsche has Tesla in its sights, then it’s safe to assume that it will be just as fast. Lastly, this type of technology is already making its way down to more affordable cars. Morgan’s EV3, for instance, is not the fastest or the quickest sports car in the world, but it just might be one of the most enjoyable. Weighing in at just 1,000 lbs., the EV3 is lighter than Morgan’s regular 3 Wheeler and promises to be equally fun.

Automakers have made huge leaps with hybrids and electric cars. And that’s something to be excited about. The current crop of supercars proves that engineers and designers are working together to make technology that was once solely used for fuel efficiency to create cars that are better than ever. An affordable sports car with hybrid technology may still be a few years away, but modern supercars show us that something like that is well worth waiting for.

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