Here's Why Ford Didn't Build A Cheaper Single Motor F-150 Lightning

Scoop / 8 Comments

It makes a lot of sense.

There may be diehard truck buyers who object to an all-electric pickup, but the 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning could accomplish the tough task of changing their minds. And isn't that what an F-150 is all about... doing the tough tasks? This new, all-electric Lightning arrives with a dual-motor setup with power supplied by two battery pack sizes. The 98 kWh Standard Range model produces 452 horsepower, up from the original 426 hp estimate, and 775 lb-ft of torque. For comparison, the F-150 Raptor only produces 450 hp and 510 lb-ft of torque from its twin-turbo V6.

Buyers who want even more power can opt for the 131 kWh Extended Range battery, which dials the output to a whopping 580 hp. Ford clearly wanted the Lightning to exceed truck buyer's expectations, which is why the company decided not to offer a single-motor variant like many other EVs.

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Speaking with F-150 Lightning Marketing Manager Jasen Turnbull, CarBuzz learned that Ford did consider building a less powerful model with only a single electric motor at the rear, and even created a prototype. "It couldn't meet our targets," Turnbull explained. "We looked at various factors such as towing, payload, and performance before deciding the capability would not be worthy of the F-150 badge."

We quickly asked if that meant a single-motor setup would be more applicable on a smaller electric pickup truck like a Maverick or Ranger. To which Turnbull responded with a friendly, "no comment on future product."

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Without the front motor (which produces equal power as the rear), the rear motor would be particularly overstressed on uphill grades while towing, a metric Ford seemed keen on for the Lightning. Though offering a single-motor variant would have potentially made the Lightning more affordable, Turnbull says it was not worth the trade-off in capability and it did not significantly improve the range. The Lightning already seems like a bargain starting at $39,974, though we imagine Ford will have trouble making dealers stick to that MSRP in this current market.

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the luxury interior in the 2021 Ford Raptor F150

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