Indian Hypercar Is Going After Koenigsegg

Supercars / Comments

The Vazirani Ekonk has 722 hp and only weighs 1,627 lbs.

India is most commonly associated with Tuk-Tuks and the mass-production of cars for third-world countries. But now, it's entering the hypercar segment spectacularly by building the lightest electric hypercar ever. Possibly.

Unfortunately, the car is called the Vazirani Ekonk. It sounds a bit iffy in English, but the word has extreme significance in India. In the Indian scriptures, Ekon signifies the beginning of divine light. Or the big bang, as we know it.

The Ekonk is the brainchild of Chunky Vazirani, who used to work for Jaguar and Rolls-Royce. He started Vazirani in 2015 to make India a serious player in the extreme vehicle segment.

You might have heard about Vazirani before. It launched its first attempt at a hypercar at the 2018 Goodwood Festival of Speed, where manufacturers usually go if they want to make a big splash in front of the super-rich. Gordon Murray recently did the same with his new 12,000 rpm hypercar slayer.

Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani

Its first car was called the Shul, pronounced shool. That car used a turbine-electric powertrain, which is massively complex and not a full EV. The idea is that a turbine, which runs on gas, charges the battery pack. It's essentially a more complex version of the range extender BMW uses in the i3.

The Ekonk is a single-seater full electric that Vazirani says is styled to look like a spaceship. That's hypercar 101. The big news is the cooling system, however. According to Vazirani, nobody has created a bespoke cooling system for batteries before. That's not strictly true. The cooling system in the Porsche Taycan is quite complex and allows you to use launch control until the battery is depleted.

Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani
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The explanation of the Ekonk's cooling system is bizarre. Vazirani says it used biomimicry, which is the study of how animals and humans use breathing to regulate body temperature. It also used ancient Indian manufacturing techniques to invent what it calls DiCo. In short, DiCo cools the batteries with air as opposed to liquid cooling used by Tesla and a few other manufacturers. According to Vazirani, this makes the Ekonk lighter, safer, faster, and more cost-effective. It also increases range.

The body is also carbon fiber, which means it weighs 738 kg or 1,627 lbs. That makes it the lightest EV ever by quite a significant margin. That title still belongs to the Mitsubishi i-Miev, as it exists out in the real world.

Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani

The power output is 722 hp, which Vazirani says is close to the one-to-one power to weight ratio, much like the Koenigsegg One:1.

Vazirani Automotive tested a mule at the new Naxtrax facility recently, and it claims the Ekonk reached 193 mph and clocked 0-62 mph in 2.54 seconds. The 0-60 mph time should dip below 2.5 seconds.

Rather worryingly, Vazirani feels the need to boast that the Ekonk has no electronic driving aid. It's just the driver, the electric motors, and the wheels' contact patches. Call us silly, but a 722-hp car should at least have ABS and a basic traction control system, especially if the whole stable of horses is available instantaneously.

Given Vazirani's gung-ho approach to safety, it's doubtful the Ekonk will ever find its way to the USA.

Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani
Vazirani

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