Lego Caterham 7 is a Work of Art

Caterham

The original Seven has been expertly replicated right down to the unibody frame and DeDion rear axle.

This is not a Lego set but the personal creation of a Spaniard who goes by the name of Sheepo. His homemade Land Rover Defender was the first pet project that caught our attention, and it appears that in the ensuing year his passion for engineering and creating fully-functional cars out of Lego bricks hasn’t waned. Built to a 1:7 scale, the model has around 2,500 parts and is powered by a battery and pair of motors that sit behind the seats over the rear axle. It also boasts a double wishbone suspension, and three-link DeDion live rear axle.

Like the original, the Lego 7 is extremely lightweight at just 2.2 kilos and, as you’ll see from the video, comes with a full set of controllable parts from a Lego-built remote control including working brakes, steering, and a five-speed sequential transmission with reverse gear.

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