Listen To The 3,000-HP Twin-Turbo Dodge Viper From Hell

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It's called the Juggernaut for a reason.

Few modern American performance cars make an impact quite like the Dodge Viper, a car that had its very own TV show, and now has a cult following. When it was first released way back in 1991, no one had seen something so exotic come out of the United States, and when the fifth-generation car exited the market in 2017, it left a gaping hole where a V10 engine could snuggly fit. Sure the void has seemingly been filled by cars such as the Dodge Challenger Hellcat, and if you're lucky, you might still find a new Viper for sale, but the era of the Viper has come to an end, and it is now up to collectors and fans to keep its spirit alive.

Will Dugas is one such fan and has decided to twin-turbo charge his 2000 gen-two model, and the following video shows just how crazy this thing really is.

YouTube/Nth Moto
YouTube/Nth Moto
YouTube/Nth Moto
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The second-generation Viper was introduced in 1996 and saw the side pipes relocate to the rear of the car. Power from the 8.0-liter V10 engine was rated at 415 horsepower and 488 lb-ft of torque, and with a relatively low compression ratio, this car was destined for boost. Dugas took his car to Nth Moto in Minneapolis to get some serious work done, and the results are pretty astounding. Nth Moto has a holistic turning philosophy where the engine is looked at as an overall system and not just as individual parts. This allowed them to build a powerplant that produces over 3,000 hp. The gen-five V10 engine features twin Garett 88-mm turbos, a stock block and aluminum heads, hydraulic lifters as well as a Cali 4200 stroker crank and a dry-sump oil system.

YouTube/Nth Moto
YouTube/Nth Moto
YouTube/Nth Moto

This car has made a best quarter-mile run of 7.3 seconds at an astounding 199 mph running on 29 psi of boost. That roughly equals 2,450 hp. Recent dyno figures have shown what this car can really do: at 39 psi it made a monumental 3,101 hp and 2,404 lb-ft of torque, and dyno graphs show the car holding its power right up to redline, with no sudden drop-offs. According to the tuner, it gains an average of 65 hp per pound of boost added and is still able to run on pump gas if need be, but prefers to live off of an ethanol blend. In the video, the Viper can be heard revving up its engine, with turbo spool noises not far behind. This is one bad mother.

YouTube/Nth Moto
YouTube/Nth Moto

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