Mazda Says What Others Won't About The Problem With EVs

Industry News

And it's firm in its belief the internal combustion engine has a future.

In case you haven’t noticed, Mazda does not offer a single EV in its entire global lineup, and it has no immediate plans to do so. How come? Because it believes the internal combustion still has a future. Automotive News has reported about the speech Robert Davis, Mazda senior vice president in charge of special assignments for North America, gave at a recent seminar. But let’s make one thing clear: Mazda is still very much committed to fuel efficiency, hence its ongoing development of its SkyActiv line up gasoline and diesel engines.

But it’s in no rush to develop EV tech for several reasons. For example, Davis made this point: "Take the $7,500 EV credit off the table? At the same time, you take the EV mandate off the table. Let the government keep the $7,500 and let the industry find the best way to meet the clean air standard. Make it C02, make it grams per mile, fuel economy, whatever feels best. But don’t mandate the particular powertrain." One of the reasons why Mazda has taken this approach is due to its small size; it simply cannot keep up with larger global automakers, so it’s forced to take its own path. Another EV related issue Davis mentioned was concerns regarding lithium-ion batteries; what will happen to them once they’re worn out?

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Unlike, say, cellphone batteries, EV batteries are much more difficult to recycle. "This is where the great thinkers of our industry need to speak up and be heard and make sure the manufacturers can do what they do best: compete against each other for the customers’ hearts and minds," Davis added. "We’re all better than this. We can do better than this. We need to consider that this not zero emissions. This is remote emissions, or displaced emissions." But his bottom line point regarding internal combustion engine technology is that there’s more innovation to be done, and Mazda will continue doing just that.

However, the Japanese automaker is not afraid to adopt new technologies, such as batteries and plug-in hybrids, “but they all share the internal combustion engine. So before we go into the time and effort and expense of adding electrification, we were convinced that a solid, efficient internal combustion engine was critical.”

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