New Twist On Dieselgate Cheat Devices Includes Gasoline-Fed Audis

Diesel

Uh-oh, a lot more trouble could be heading Volkswagen's way.

The whole Dieselgate scandal really shook up the motoring industry, people were lied to, tests were cheated on and heads rolled. More details of the cheating emerges on an almost bi-monthly basis and Volkswagen is doing it's best effort at damage control - at a huge cost. In short, cars were fitted with cheat devices on diesel cars that showed emissions to be in line with guidelines set out by the EPA and the Clean to Air Act when tested in a lab-type setting. The emissions were sometimes 40 percent higher than allowed.

While gasoline car owners had fun teasing the diesel owners about how their cars are killing the planet, they may have to eat a chunk of humble pie soon. Germany's Bild am Sonntag may have just blown the lid off yet another cover up by the manufacturer and it's not limited to diesel cars. They just reported that US regulator CARB (California Air Resource Board) has been doing some testing of its own and found that some Audi vehicles with automatic transmissions have software fitted that lowers the carbon dioxide emissions when it detects the car is being used in a test environment. It's also been reported that this isn't the same device that's already landed the automotive group in trouble.

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It is now alleged that certain automatic transmission cars had software fitted that detects movement on the steering wheel, and when there's 15-degrees or less movement the device determines the car to be in a lab and the cheat kicks in to manipulate the emissions. The article alludes to it being on 3.0-liter engined models, but we'll have to wait for more information before anyone knows for sure. Apparently Audi stopped using this software in May of 2016, some time after Dieselgate broke news. Taking huge chances for sure. The paper also reported that both Audi and CARB declined to comment citing ongoing discussions with regulators on a proposed fix. Can you smell that? Smells like a lawsuit flood.

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