No Lamborghini Collection Will Be Complete Without This

Supercars / Comments

Imagine this on your bedroom wall.

Lamborghini changed forever back in 1998 when VW's Audi division purchased the then-struggling Italian supercar company. Audi sent its people to Sant'Agata Bologna with a mission to figure out how to improve production. It didn't take them long to realize this required a major factory overhaul. In 2001, that huge task was finished and a museum was opened where the old factory once stood.

Walking inside one could find many great Lamborghinis of the past on display, among them a 350GT, Countach, Islero, and Jarama. But it was impossible not to notice something mounted to the wall. Hint: it wasn't a poster. It was a Lamborghini Diablo VT. Call it the ultimate 3D poster.

Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions

There was something very different about this particular Diablo VT, however, grandfather of today's Lamborghini Aventador S. It previously served as a full-size factory prototype without the naturally aspirated 6.0-liter V12 found in the series production cars or the five-speed manual transmission. Still, it's a valuable piece of Lamborghini memorabilia and it's heading to auction at next month's Mecum Auctions Indy 2020 event.

From the outside, it looks identical to the road-going Diablo VT. Every single one of its body panels is interchangeable with those on production-spec Diablo VTs. And no, it never once had an engine or transmission, so there's no point attempting to search for a numbers-matching V12. It never existed.

2020 Cars That Will Be Future Classics
2020 Cars That Will Be Future Classics
Best Off-Road Vehicles For 2020
Best Off-Road Vehicles For 2020
Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions

However, this prototype does feature a full interior with all production trim elements. Perhaps it's best to think of this Diablo as the ultimate piece of gearhead wall art. Over the years, it's been featured in several magazines. The listing does not state when it was removed from the Lamborghini Factory Museum wall, but it is still fully intact.

The price? Well, that'll actually be kind of interesting because it's being offered without a reserve. How much will someone be willing to pay for a Lamborghini that doesn't drive? Wealthy collectors will surely be on hand to place an online-only bid. Who wouldn't want to mount this thing in their private garage?

It's just too cool to leave planted on the ground.

Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions
Mecum Auctions
Source Credits: Mecum Auctions

Join The Discussion

Popular Tags Cars