One-Off Gold Ford Mustang Is A James Bond Car With A Fascinating History

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And now it's looking for a new owner.

Having starred in the famous 'Bullitt' car chase with Steve McQueen tearing up the streets of San Francisco, the Ford Mustang is movie car royalty. This wasn't the pony car's first major on-screen appearance, however - that would be the 1964 James Bond flick 'Goldfinger,' which introduced audiences to the iconic Aston Martin DB5.

In the film, Tilly Masterson, played by Tania Mallet, tries to escape from Bond on Swiss mountain roads in a white Ford Mustang convertible. After catching up with her, Bond activates a wheel spinner in the DB5 to slash one of the Mustang's tires in the memorable scene. This was not the Mustang that was originally going to be used in the film, however.

Hemmings
Hemmings
Hemmings
Hemmings

Originally, the producers made a deal with Ford to supply a custom-built 1965 Ford Mustang Fastback finished in gold for the film. Built as a one-off by Ford, the unique Mustang featured a metal-flake gold livery, a unique front valance with high-power driving lamps, and unique wheels with gold accents. The bespoke touches continued in the two-tone black and metallic gold interior, which features a bespoke overhead console with auxiliary gauges and switches. To give it some extra muscle, Ford fitted a 4.7-liter, 305-hp engine modified by Shelby.

Unfortunately, Ford couldn't finish the golden Mustang in time for the film's production, so the white convertible Mustang was used as a substitute instead.

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Hemmings
Hemmings
Hemmings
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Luckily, Ford didn't scrap the project. Upon completion, the golden Mustang Fastback was shown off at movie-related promotional events before being sold to a Ford employee from Plymouth Michigan. It was given to his son, who raced it at local drag strips. The car was then sold in 1988 and was restored back to its former glory before its current owner acquired it in 2001.

Despite its age, the lost movie car only has 22,000 miles on the odometer and is in excellent condition restored to its original specification. For the first time in decades, the forgotten Goldfinger Mustang is currently being sold by Hemmings for $139,500. That may seem like a lot for a 1960s Mustang, but this has to be one of the rarest in the world considering its bespoke specification and fascinating Hollywood history.

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Hemmings
Hemmings
Hemmings
Hemmings
Hemmings
Hemmings
Source Credits: Hemmings

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