Original Eleanor Mustang Will Fetch A Fortune

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It's one of only three surviving Eleanor Mustangs from the 2000 'Gone in 60 Seconds' remake.

Earlier this year, the 1968 Ford Mustang 390GT driven by Steve McQueen in 'Bullitt' sold for a staggering $3.74 million at auction, setting a new auction sales record. That record has since been beaten by the 1965 Ford Mustang Shelby GT350R prototype raced by Ken Miles, which sold for $3.85 million.

And now another iconic movie-star Mustang is looking for a new owner and will undoubtedly sell for big bucks. We're talking about the 1967 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 better known as Eleanor made famous by the 2000 'Gone in 60 Seconds' remake starring Nicolas Cage and Angelina Jolie.

ChromeCars
ChromeCars

While there are plenty of Eleanor replica cars you can buy, this is the real deal. According to the sales listing by ChromeCars in Germany, this is one of the original hero cars built for the movie so it's been driven by Nicolas Cage, who did most of his own stunt driving in the film.

Originally, eleven Eleanor Mustangs were built and five were used for shooting, but only three are known to still survive today. This is the seventh example of the original production run. Each car was built by Cinema Vehicle Services and is based on a 1967 Ford Mustang GT Fastback modified with a custom body kit to look like a Mustang Shelby GT500.

ChromeCars
ChromeCars
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Its distinctive gun metal grey paint job with contrasting black racing stripes made it an instant movie car icon. Under the hood is a 5.8-liter eight-cylinder Ford Racing crate engine producing 400 horsepower, mated to a four-speed manual transmission. And yes, the shifter knob has the "Go Baby Go" button Nicolas Cage used in the film to active nitrous that enabled Eleanor to leave the cops for dust.

Since the car was built over 20 years ago, it's clocked up 72,815 miles. There's no sales price, but don't be surprised if Eleanor fetches seven figures since other surviving cars have sold for over $1 million.

Sony Pictures Entertainment
Sony Pictures Entertainment
Sony Pictures Entertainment
Source Credits: ChromeCars

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