Porsche Taycan Driver Clocks Over 130 MPH In 60 MPH Zone

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And the driver was on a test drive at the time.

If you've ever been to The Netherlands, you'll know that getting around on a bicycle is a hugely popular choice. Electric bicycles, or e-bikes, have also grown in popularity in the region, but it was an entirely different mode of electrified transportation that had Dutch police officers in a huff recently.

A driver in a Porsche Taycan, the brand's first-ever electric car, was clocked doing acrazy 214 km/h in a 100 km/h zone. In American miles-per-hour, that translates to 133 mph in a zone where the maximum was 62 mph. That's not something you can blame on losing concentration for a few seconds, of course. An Instagram post from hartvoorautos_nl revealed the 214km/h readout on a speed-tracking device.

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Front Angle View Porsche
Porsche

Even worse, the driver in question was allegedly on a test drive. Either the driver was alone, or the Dutch Porsche dealer in the passenger seat was determined to make a sale by demonstrating the full extent of the Taycan's abilities. While we have no further details of the driver, we do know that they're 24-years-old. It's not clear what the penalty is for driving that much over the limit in Holland, but we can't imagine it'll be taken lightly.

Not that the driver's antics are justified in any way, but the Taycan's astonishing performance probably has something to do with it. In the case of the Taycan Turbo S, it can hit 60 mph in just 2.6 seconds thanks to an outrageous 750 horsepower and all-wheel-drive. Even the least powerful Taycan 4S still charges to 60 mph in 3.8 seconds.

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The driver in question would have been much better off testing the Taycan on Germany's unrestricted Autobahn. Last year, we reported on the German parliament voting against a proposed plan to set national speed limits on the famed road. So, if you can get to Germany, there's still a way to take your electrified performance car to the limit legally.

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