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Porsche Wants Owners To Feel Less Guilty About Pollution

Sports Car

Future Taycan owners excluded.

Reducing fuel emissions has become a hot button issue and governments are enacting new legislation to force automakers to do this. They have no choice but to comply if they want to continue selling vehicles in those markets. It doesn’t matter whether or not the automaker is mainstream or high performance; emissions standards must and will be met, but this takes time.

Porsche, for example, is set to unveil its first-ever zero-emissions vehicle, the all-electric Taycan, next month at the 2019 Frankfurt Motor Show. Eventually, more Porsche EVs will arrive, but it’ll take time (more PHEVs will come before then). Until that happens, Porsche is making noble efforts to reduce carbon emissions and it wants to help its customers reach carbon neutrality.

To do so, it has launched Project Impact, an online tool that connects individual C02 emissions to specific climate projects. This online tool estimates an individual’s carbon dioxide emissions based on mileage and average fuel consumption. Users are then asked to follow a link to make a financial contribution to specifically chosen environmental projects that will help offset their carbon footprints. These projects include forest protection in the US, hydropower in Vietnam, habitat preservation in Zimbabwe, and solar energy in Mexico.

"Porsche drivers want it all, and offering an option for greater sustainability is part of creating a superb Porsche experience,” said Klaus Zellmer, President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America. "Porsche Impact connects our strategies for innovation, mobility and sustainability with the individual customer.”

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Obviously, the amount donated varies from vehicle to vehicle, but Porsche has calculated an example with a 2019 Cayenne S that’s been driven 10,000 miles a year. This would generate an offset contribution between $67 and $152 annually, though the final amount would depend on which project is chosen by the customer. To prove how committed it is to Porsche Impact, the automaker has already enrolled all of its Porsche Experience Center and Porsche Passport subscription fleet cars in the program.

Porsche Impact is actually managed by a Swiss-based carbon finance consultancy called South Pole, and it’s been around since 2018, though it was previously only offered to customers in the UK, Germany, and Poland.

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