See How The Modern-Day Ferrari Daytona Shooting Brake Design Evolved

Video / Comments

A famous automotive designer talks us through the process.

Niels van Roij Design is making a name for itself for its stunning one-off coachbuilt cars. The design house attracted attention when it created one of the world's first Tesla Model S Shooting Brake. More recently, the design firm revealed its take on the Ferrari 250 GT SWB Breadvan racer based on a 550 Maranello. For its next ambitious coachbuilding project, Niels van Roij Design is paying tribute to the obscure Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Shooting Brake - one of the Ferrari GTC4Lusso's predecessors.

As work on the Daytona Shooting Brake Hommage continues, Niels van Roij himself has provided some interesting insights into the design in a new video answering questions from fans.

Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design

Using early sketches, Niels talks us through the painstaking design process. Based on a Ferrari 599 GTB, almost every body panel of the Daytona Shooting Brake Hommage is bespoke, although the designer reveals that the door sections and glass were retrained.

One of the biggest challenges was integrating the 599 GTB's doors onto a car with a radically different roofline and side view. In one sketch, a large glass panel covers the rear section of the roof, but a divider was added to split the glass as the design evolved. The rear window was also modified with chopped top and bottom corners, creating a more angular design.

How The Corvette Z06 Compares To Nurburgring Rivals
How The Corvette Z06 Compares To Nurburgring Rivals
Super Sports Car Comparison: Chevy C8 Corvette Z06 Vs. Porsche 911 GT3
Super Sports Car Comparison: Chevy C8 Corvette Z06 Vs. Porsche 911 GT3
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design

Another distinctive design element is the Daytona's sharp character line, which starts at the rear window and flows into the rear fender, door, and front fender. Niels also wasn't happy with the car's triangular B-pillar. To rectify this, the shape of the butterfly window was changed to make it flow with the shape of the door more seamlessly.

The final design has not been revealed yet, but photos on Instagram show that the individual back panels have now been made by hand since the clay model was completed and the right hand side of the car has already been welded together. We can't wait to see the final rest of this automotive work of art.

Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design
Niels van Roij Design

Join The Discussion

Gallery

15
Photos
Back
To Top