Someone Turned A Porsche Boxster Into A 1960s F1 Car

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You have to admire the amount of work and passion going into this ambitious project.

Modern F1 cars represent the pinnacle of motorsport technology, but there will always be fans who prefer the cruder designs of classic F1 cars. Wesley Kagan is a huge fan of F1 cars from the 1960s at a time when the sport was genuinely dangerous. This era spawned many iconic racing cars such as Jim Clark's Lotus 49.

Wesley believes the Lotus Type 49 is a "masterpiece of engineering," which inspired him to recreate the seminal racecar for the modern era. This isn't a replica, however, but the design is heavily inspired by 1960s F1 cars. Wesley used Forza Motorsport to mock up a shell before buying a used Porsche Boxster to use as the donor car.

Wesley Kagan / YouTube
Wesley Kagan / YouTube

Costing only $2,500, this was the cheapest example he could find in the US. While the Boxster had seen better days, it supplied Wesley with a running engine, transmission, brakes, steering rack, and other small components Wesley needed to turn his dream into a reality.

Six months later, Wesley's 1960s F1 tribute car project started to take shape. There's no bodywork so all the components are exposed, making the car look more like an Ariel Atom, but you can still see the 1960s F1 design inspirations. The video shows Wesley preparing the car for its first track day.

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Wesley Kagan / YouTube
Wesley Kagan / YouTube

Before the car could be taken to its first track day, Wesley needed to fix problems with the crank pressure and radiator and finetune the suspension. Towards the end of the video, the custom race car gets taken for a cruise on the track. We get a brief glimpse of the car blasting past at a brisker pace, but it's probably going to be a while before we get to see this Lotus 49 tribute car being driven at racing speed since this is still a work in progress project.

You have to commend the amount of work, time, and passion that went into this incredibly ambitious project. At the time of the video being posted, the project has been eight months in the making, so we're keen to see how it progresses.

Wesley Kagan / YouTube
Wesley Kagan / YouTube

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