The 5 Best Cars For Sale At RM Sotheby's Youngtimer Collection Auction

Auctions / Comments

First you dream about them, and then you buy them years later.

RM Sotheby's will be offering The Youngtimer Collection for auction in Miami on 10 December.

Just over 55 cars will be up for sale, making this auction unique because it leans toward modern classics. So, if you grew up in the late '80s and '90s (and even the early noughties) and were fixated on the new cars that came out at the time, this auction is where you need to be.

It's essentially a collection of poster cars for '90s kids who can now afford to buy the real deal. Unfortunately, we can't take a close look at all of them, so we took the liberty of selecting five beauties we'd definitely bid on.

RM Sotheby's

1991 Lamborghini LM002

In these EV times, there's nothing else you can buy that sends a more explicit message that you're not going to join the masses. Not even a Lamborghini Urus puts the message across as firmly as the Rambo Lambo. The LM002 famously started life as a concept car for the military called the Cheetah. It didn't work out, so Lamborghini put the V12 from Countach under the hood and sold it to the public.

Even in the "greed is good" late '80s and early '90s, this car was considered too ostentatious, which means Lamborghini sold roughly 300 units. It's slow, not particularly good at off-roading, and the fuel consumption is measured in feet per gallon. This is a late model with a full service history and low mileage and is expected to sell around $200,000-$250,000.

Still, it's now cooler than ever, knowing we'll never see anything like it again. Lamborghini is going environmentally friendly and recently debuted the Huracan Sterrato, which will is one of the last models to use the famous 5.2-liter naturally aspirated V10 engine.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

1996 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

This '96 Turbo has 16,620 miles on the clock, so the 3.6-liter turbocharged is still mint. The 993 Turbo was also the last of the air-cooled Porsches, which is why you want one of these.

Porsche got the most it could get out of the air-cooled engine before finally moving on to the water-cooled era. Don't get us wrong, air-cooled engines have obvious drawbacks, but this model represents a turning point and an end of an era.

The bright blue exterior is unique, as most Turbos from this era were purchased in red and black. It's an obvious investment, which is why it's expected to go for between $300,000-$350,000. The good news is that it will only increase in value.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

1999 Bentley Turbo RT Mulliner

Bentley's Mulliner department has been around for a while and continues building ultra-exclusive machines.

But here's a way to get into a one-of-56 model without paying more than a million. The Turbo RT Mulliner has also aged exceptionally well and looks positively sinister in the deep black hue.

By modern standards, the turbocharged 6.75-liter V8 is hardly mind-blowing. It produces 420 horsepower and 534 lb-ft of torque. Nowadays, there are naturally aspirated crate engines that are more powerful, but the attraction here is the high torque figure.

Bentleys are not built for drag-racing youngsters in Mustangs and Challengers. They're meant to give you a satisfying surge in your lower back as you calmly ride a seemingly endless wave of turbocharged torque. This model is expected to sell between $150,000-$200,000.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

2008 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren Roadster

The SLR was a highly underappreciated car when it was new. It was introduced the same year as the Porsche Carrera GT, which stole all of its thunder.

But looking at it now, one can't help but be impressed. Its supercharged V8 produces 626 hp, which is still a lot by modern standards. And it has an automatic gearbox and all of the luxuries you could get from a Mercedes-Benz SL at the time. We think most people were simply confused by it. People were expecting a supercar, and instead, Mercedes and McLaren built the ultimate grand tourer.

This example is one of 670 ever built and has fewer than 20,000 miles on the clock, so it's expected to sell between $275,000-$325,000.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

1987 Mercedes-Benz 560 SEC AMG 6.0 'Wide-Body'

This is one of the most famous AMGs ever made, thanks in part to a 5.5-liter V8 bored out to a full 6.0 liters. It also boasts high-performance camshafts, a modified throttle body, an upgraded exhaust, and ported intake manifold.

The engine output of 385 hp is not great by today's standards. Even four-cylinder AMGs produce more these days, but that's the problem. AMG is now moving away from big engines in small bodies. The next-generation C63 is a plug-in hybrid, for goodness sake. While it may produce colossal power, it will never sound as good as this.

This 560 is expected to sell between $225,000-$275,000, but as AMG introduces more downsized models, this car will only increase in value.

RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's
RM Sotheby's

Join The Discussion

Gallery

20
Photos

Related Cars

Back
To Top