The Aston Martin Valkyrie Will Spawn A New Range Of “Incredible” Cars

Supercar

Looks like the Aston Martin Valkyrie will be the first of many limited-run hypercars built with Red Bull.

The much-anticipated Aston Martin Valkyrie will form part of a new hypercar generation powered by race car technology alongside the Mercedes-AMG Project One and McLaren BP23 hypercar. While the 1,130-hp Valkyrie looks like it will represent the pinnacle of performance possible in an Aston Martin road car, it will apparently be the first of many “incredible” new hypercars to come as part of its expanded partnership with Red Bull, which is collaborating with Aston Martin to develop the Valkyrie.

Autocar reports that Aston Martin’s “Innovation Partnership” has been strengthened in a deal that will see both companies collaborate on future products and Aston Martin serving as the F1 team’s title sponsor. While no details have been released about the products Aston Martin and Red Bull will collaborate on, the British automaker referred to the Valkyrie as the “first in a line of incredible products” following the new agreement, suggesting that more limited-run hypercars with extreme performance will follow the Valkyrie after it launches in 2019. To develop these new cars, a new Aston Martin Advanced Performance Center will open later this year.

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It will be based at Red Bull Racing’s headquarters in Milton Keyenes, UK, and house around 110 new Aston Martin staff working as engineers and designers on these new sports cars. Aston Martin has already announced plans to develop a mid-engined supercar to rival the Ferrari 488, but it isn’t clear if this is part of Red Bull’s collaboration. CEO Andy Palmer is also considering entering Formula One as an engine supplier, but not until new technical rules and regulations are in place in 2021. “We are not about to enter an engine war with no restrictions in cost or dynamometer hours, but if the FIA can create the right environment, we would be interested in getting involved,” he said.

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