The Blackest Porsche 911 Ever Is Even Blacker Than Vantablack

Design / 15 Comments

It absorbs almost 100% of light.

Porsche offers one of the most expansive color pallets of any automaker. You can even view most of Porsche's fabulous paint-to-sample options on the online configurator. But even the master of the 'Rennbow' doesn't offer Vantablack, the blackest, black known to man. BMW experimented with this unreal color on an X6 a few years ago, and now a Japanese Porsche owner has applied something similar on their 911. The results are hauntingly spectacular.

The car in question is a Porsche 911 Turbo, specifically a 991 generation model. It began life with standard black paint before being sprayed in Musou Black, a water-based acrylic paint. Most black acrylic absorbs anywhere from 94-98% of visible light, but Musou Black absorbs a whopping 99.905%. That means it's darker than Vantablack.

Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube

This is the same paint that was previously used on a Lancer Evo to create the world's darkest Mitsubishi. Covering an entire car in this stuff isn't cheap, as a single one-liter bottle costs over $132. Since the video is in Japanese, we aren't sure how much of the stuff was required for the 911. After professionally wrapping and spraying the car, the 911 Turbo is taken out and driven on the streets of Japan. It almost looks like the car was photoshopped into the rest of the video.

Seeing it outside the paint booth, the 911 almost appears fake, as if someone made a poor color change using photo editing software. The 911 is nearly invisible at night, with the lights and other elements sticking out like sore thumbs.

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Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube

Although this Musou Black 911 is incredibly cool, we wouldn't recommend painting it on your car. For starters, we aren't sure about the legality of something like this in the United States, since the color is quite disorienting for other drivers. The paint would also be nearly impossible to maintain due to its coarse finish. It can not be waxed or have a clear coat protection, meaning it's highly vulnerable to rain and the elements. So unless your plan is to build a show car to grab attention for a trophy, we can't see much practical purpose. We definitely wouldn't want this finish while traveling late at night.

Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube
Pit One/YouTube

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