The Centenario Proves Lamborghini Can Still Do Crazy

2016 Geneva Motor Show

And capture the hearts of old fans.

I’ve been a Lamborghini fan ever since elementary school. In fact, the first car that really took my breath away and got me interested in the automotive industry was the Lamborghini Murcielago. Looking back at it, it’s easy to see why. The 2001 Lamborghini Murcielago was unlike anything else on the road. If you’re a Ferrari fan, 2001 wasn’t a memorable year for the prancing horse. Sure it was a good year for F1, but the road cars included the Ferrari 360, 550 Barchetta and 456M, none of which took my breath away in the same way as the Murci.

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These are nothing compared to the gorgeously styled, insane and poster-worthy Murcielago. Besides its stunning design, the Murcielago featured a 6.2-liter V12 that was mounted right in the middle of the supercar and put out 575 hp and 479 lb-ft of torque. There’s no flappy-paddle nonsense here either, as the first models were fitted with a six-speed manual transmission. It even had doors that opened upwards. It was one of the first Lamborghini’s I fell in love with and the more recent supercars from the automaker have been missing the same dramatic flair. But the new Centenario brings back the same passion that I once felt for the brand.

Modern Lamborghinis are too much like the counterparts the automaker swore to take on. But the Centenario, now that thing looks unlike anything else on the road or ever envisioned. There are plenty of sharp edges, gaping vents, a splitter that looks like it wouldn’t be able to drive over a piece of paper and a rear end that would be more fitting on a spaceship. It’s a work of art that brings out the inner child in you, which is exactly what a Lamborghini should do. I’m a little disappointed that the automaker didn’t put a fire-breathing monster in the middle of the supercar, but I guess a tuned version of the Aventador SV’s 6.5-liter V12 should do.

With only 20 coupes and 20 roadsters being built, which have all already been accounted for, this beast will most likely never been seen by the majority of enthusiasts. And that’s a bad thing. The Centenario puts Lamborghini back on the map as one of the best poster supercar automakers. I may be a little too old for posters, but I’d be willing to paint a massive Centenario on one of my walls as my way of saying thanks to the automaker for returning to its old ways. Maybe, just maybe, Lamborghini will create a more mass-produced supercar that looks similar to the Centenario that I can sell my kidneys to own.

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