The Ferrari SP3JC Is Actually Based On Old F12 TdF

One-off

Less powerful than the 812, but harder of core.

Earlier we brought you the first images and whatever information we could gather and glean on the SP3JC – a one-off Ferrari roadster that we figured was based on the 812 Superfast. Now the Prancing Horse marque has released official details and photos, and it turns out we were mistaken.

This one-of-a-kind roadster is actually based on the F12 TdF, the hardcore version of the F12 Berlinetta on which the newer 812 is also based. But it still points the way in the clearest way yet to the 812 convertible we're expecting to follow in the coming months.

With its Tour-de-France underpinnings, the SP3JC packs a V12 producing 769 horsepower, ostensibly from 6.3 liters rather than the 6.5 in the 812. Assuming torque's also carried over from the TdF, we'd be looking at 520 lb-ft (instead of the Superfast's 530).

Or rather its (evidently very fortunate) commissioning owner would, we should say. Maranello stopped short of confirming vintage Ferrari broker extraordinaire John Collins (whose initials adorn the nameplate) as the customer, identifying him only as “a Ferrari client and collector whose brief set out to create a pure, uncompromising roadster using the chassis and running gear of the F12tdf.”

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Why the TdF, then, and not the newer 812? The answer could be as simple as the two-plus years it's said to have taken to develop the SP3JC, when the Superfast wasn't released until the spring of 2017. But then again, Collins may have preferred the more hardcore setup of the TdF – which did, after all, manage to lap the factory's Fiorano test track (at 1:21) half a second faster than the Superfast (1:21.5).

The owner chose a rather unusual livery, said to be inspired by his love of Pop Art as much as his penchant for old Prancing Horses.

The SP3JC is painted in Bianco Italia (not silver as it originally seemed) with Azzurro Met (a shade that looks close to French racing blue) and Giallo Modena highlights. Elements of the bodywork, specially designed by the Ferrari Styling Centre, are unique to the one-off, which features glass inserts in the hood to showcase the engine, carbon-fiber roll hoops, a brushed aluminum fuel cap, and a blue leather cockpit with white inserts. All of which adds up to a rather unique set of wheels (though those appear to be borrowed from the 812) that will likely never be replicated.

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