Lamborghini's Sexiest Supercar Just Turned 50

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The Miura SV is still one of the automotive world's all-time greats.

Think back on the prettiest cars of all time, and the Lamborghini Miura will surely sit near the top of anyone's list. A predecessor to the modern-day Lamborghini Aventador SVJ, the Miura was Lamborghini's first mid-engined model and it set the trend for all future supercars to follow. The Miura spawned several versions during its eight-year lifespan, culminating with the Miura SV, shown in March 1971 on Lamborghini's Geneva Motor Show stand. This final variant was announced alongside the Countach LP 500, a concept vehicle that went on to succeed the Miura.

In 2021, Lamborghini is celebrating the Miura SV's 50th birthday with a drool-worthy library of photos. This car still looks stunning 50 years later, which might explain why auction prices are well into the seven-figure range. Lamborghini itself even refers to the Miura SV as its "most sought-after production car."

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Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini

The SV benefited from lessons learned during the Miura's first five years in production. Its 4.0-liter V12 engine was more potent with 385 horsepower at 7,850 rpm, and it was easier to drive courtesy of an improved torque curve. Other minor changes included a new setting for the four Weber triple-barrel carburetors and a separate lubrication system between the engine and gearbox.

Lamborghini improved the handling drastically on this model as well. The SV features a stiffer chassis with strategic reinforcements, a revised rear suspension with new anchor points and arms, and a stretched track to accommodate wider tires. A new wheel design helped the SV look even sportier than a standard Miura and most customers opted to have them finished in gold.

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Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini
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All The Amazing Features Of The Mercedes EQS
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Unlike the original Miura, the SV did not have the signature "eyelashes" around its headlights. Surprisingly, there was no technical reason for this change but company owner Ferruccio Lamborghini thought getting rid of them might cut down on the Miura's production time. Inside, the SV was garnished with more leather and chromed details to make the cabin feel more modern.

Miura SV production ended in 1973 after 150 units were produced. Two years later, a final example was manufactured for Walter Wolf. It now sits at the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata Bolognese.

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Lamborghini
Lamborghini
Lamborghini

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