The Lamborghini Diablo Is For Real Drivers Who Can Drive Stick

Review

"As beautiful as it is this car is not for everyone."

Anybody with lots of money and/or absolutely no driving skills can walk into a supercar dealership and buy something today. Thanks to technologies such as stability control and single and dual-clutch gearboxes, supercars are more refined and safe than ever. But for many years supercars required actual driving skills, like driving stick. The Lamborghini Diablo, built from 1990 until 2001, was the last V12-powered Lambo to be offered solely with a manual. In this case, a five-speed manual.

Not that we don’t love Lambos today, but the Diablo was, more or less, the end of an era; Volkswagen took over in time to develop the Murcielago. This retro edition of Motor Week features their 1993 Diablo test drive. “As beautiful as it is this car is not for everyone,” says host John Davis. That’s damn right.

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