The Most Wedgy Wagon Ever Built Is Worth Every Penny

Auction

If you do, you've got quite a reserve bid to match.

Aston Martin isn't a brand you'd associate with station wagons - or, as they tend to be referred to when you get above a certain point in the automotive pecking order, 'shooting brakes'. For sure, it's dabbled in more practical cars like the Rapide sedan family, but that's about as far as Aston Martin's gone with user-friendly grand tourers. However, a handful of coachbuilders have bolted on bigger trunks to Aston Martin models over the years, and perhaps the most distinctive of them all is heading to the Bonhams auction blocks today, May 21.

It's a unique station wagon version of an already highly exclusive car: the Aston Martin Lagonda. Arguably the most outrageous and divisive Aston Martin ever built, thanks to its angular bodywork and innovative LED display (do remember that the car first went on sale in 1976!), the Lagonda was in the end crippled by the fact it cost as much as a contemporary Rolls-Royce - though some wealthy eccentrics did indeed purchase a Lagonda over the course of the car's 12-year production run. In fact, one felt the car was so ordinary in its original state, that the owner got in contact with the Swiss firm Roos Engineering to convert it into a shooting brake, with the end result being the car you see here in these pictures.

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And you know what? The car seems to work really well visually as a wagon. Maybe it's the passage of time that's softened the initial shock of those looks, or the fact this author's a die-hard boxy Volvo wagon fanboy, but the Aston Martin Lagonda Station Wagon could very well be the coolest-looking load lugger you can buy today. It seems quite a few people share that sentiment, too, as Bonhams expected this one-off Lagonda to sell for nearly $300,000. A lot of money, for a car that was poorly received and hopelessly unreliable back in its day, but surely the expense is worth it when the end result is the keys and ownership deeds to a wagon as unique and as distinctive is this?

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