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There's Good And Bad News About The Nissan GT-R

Supercar / 10 Comments

Which do you want first?

Today's Nissan GT-R dates back to 2007. Kind of hard to believe, we know, but it's a fact. Over the past dozen years, Nissan has regularly updated Godzilla to keep it in the game and it remains a formidable player in the supercar world. But nevertheless, it is showing its age, especially as hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and all-electric supercars are coming onto the scene. That's the bad news.

The good news is that the R35 GT-R might stick around for another few years. We've reported off and on about the next-generation GT-R, specifically whether it will adopt an EV powertrain. Perhaps it'll be a PHEV? Or, will it continue with a twin-turbo internal combustion engine only? We honestly don't have an answer and, according to a new report from Australia's Motoring, neither does Nissan.

via Nissan
via Nissan
via Nissan

The Japanese automaker remains undecided between the next GT-R being either a hybrid or all-electric. Development is currently taking place, but without a final management decision is made regarding the powertrain, it's kind of hard for designers and engineers, led by Hiroshi Tamura, to move forward. In the meantime, Tamura's team is waiting in Yokohama, Japan for the good word. Unfortunately, that green light could take more time.

Tamura told Motoring that "I have in my mind, but not for outside. So nobody knows. I cannot tell you. But I can say, imaging for a next-generation [car] is already in a chat. Talking about the solutions." What this essentially sounds like is a lot of talk with no final decisions.

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In the more immediate future, the existing R35 GT-R has received yet another mild refresh for the 2020 model year – and there could be more changes to come. Tamura believes the current GT-R program could run for up to 20 years without major changes happening to its twin-turbo V6 and all-wheel drive system. "We are still just at 12 years. This body construction I want to keep for as long as possible." The R35's predecessors, the R32, R33, and R34 were in service for a combined 14 years, and all three shared a basic structure. It was the R35 that was all-new.

With that in mind, it's entirely possible the R35 will remain in service for another couple of years. Doing so ought to give Nissan management plenty of time to decide what to do next.

via Nissan
via Nissan
via Nissan
via Nissan
via Nissan

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