There's More Bad News For C8 Corvette Shoppers

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GM has been forced to shutter its Bowling Green factory due to a supply issue.

Just as things were looking up for Chevrolet Corvette C8 production, with production stabilizing across two shifts producing an average of 186 cars per day, GM's Bowling Green Assembly Plant in Kentucky has hit another roadblock.

Facing a surging coronavirus infection rate, Mexico has imposed new shutdown restrictions affecting numerous industries across the country, and that's led to a supply shortage from some of the Corvette's Mexican parts suppliers. The Detroit News reports that GM sent out an alert informing employees and hourly workers that production has been canceled for Thursday and Friday of this week, although normal operations are expected to resume Monday.

2020-2021 Chevrolet Corvette C8 Front View Chevrolet
2020-2021 Chevrolet Corvette C8 Forward View Chevrolet
2020-2021 Chevrolet Corvette C8 Rear View Driving Chevrolet

GM didn't divulge which specific Corvette components are being held up due to Mexico's lockdown orders, but the country has become a major automotive supply hub for the North American market in recent years, and we do know that at least some of the C8's wiring looms come from Mexico.

This marks the second production shutdown at GM's Bowling Green Assembly in a month; in October, the facility shuttered for a full week due to a separate, unspecified supply shortage. If this becomes a trend, it could pose problems for the plant's current plans to switch over to 2021 Corvette production on December 8.

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2020-2021 Chevrolet Corvette C8 Front View Driving Chevrolet
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Speaking to The Detroit News, GM spokesperson David Barnas confirmed that the automaker "expect[s] to resume normal operations on Monday, November 16." He says that GM's "supply chain, manufacturing and engineering teams are working closely with our supply base to mitigate any further impact on production."

Hopefully, then, there won't be any further hiccups as GM builds the rest of its 2020 Chevrolet Corvette examples and transitions to 2021 production, but we're cautious in our optimism. The brand new sports car has had a rough go since its introduction, with production being majorly disrupted not only by the global pandemic, but by a 40-day UAW strike in the summer of 2019. Like the year 2020 itself, it might be cursed.

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Source Credits: The Detroit News

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