These Are The Things Most People Don’t Know About The Ford GT

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Like an Area 51 prototype, the Ford GT was created in secrecy and is chalked full of technology.

Compared to the rest of the auto industry, the Ford GT makes everything else look boring. This isn’t just a reference to the wickedly cool styling on the GT, everything about it, from development to conception, calls for attention because the car is shrouded in the type of secrecy that you’d expect from an Illuminati meeting. The original Ford GT was made to beat Ferrari because Henry Ford II was pissed that Enzo Ferrari wouldn’t sell him the Ferrari brand.

This spirit of competition is what the Ford GT was born into, and it shines clearly through the Liquid Blue paint. Even though the car isn’t supposed to hit the streets until 2017, the radically different design and unique story of the Ford GT’s birth offers a wealth of information about the car that will put Ford back on Ferrari’s radar. Everything about the Ford GT’s conception was different. It was designed and built in a basement at an unknown Ford office and the whole time, only a handful of higher ups even knew the car was in the pipeline. It must have been a huge surprise for Ford engineers when such a technologically advanced car hit an auto show on their doorstep without them knowing a whisper about it.

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Despite the secrecy, progress was not hindered on the car, especially because it only took this quiet group of engineers a year of development time to create the car and show its nearly production-ready concept at the Detroit Auto Show. For the auto industry, this is light speed, especially when you consider the technological details on the car. For one, Ford claimed that it wanted the GT to have the best power to weight ratio, not for a Ford, and not even for its class, but for any production car period. When looking at things from the perspective of trying to attain maximum lightness, the car’s unique features start to make sense. One example is the two jobs that many of the parts have.

The tail lamps are really just LEDs surrounding a turbo exhaust. Those flying buttresses may look cool but they are there in part to help save weight. Not only do they help taper the car at the rear for better aerodynamics, but the metal that usually fills those gaps and weighs down other cars is gone on the GT. They also double as aerodynamic pieces creating downforce and diverting air to the active rear wing while vents towards the bottom of the buttresses suck in air for use in the turbochargers. The 3.5-liter twin-turbo EcoBoost V6 may seem like a small underpowered machine for a car that is supposed to beat Ferrari, but it makes over 600 horsepower and by losing two cylinders, it sheds even more weight.

This power is unaltered by heavy hybrid drivetrains like those on the LaFerrari and Porsche 918; instead the only filter is a seven-speed dual clutch transmission that sends power to the rear. While 600 ponies might not sound like a lot in a world inhabited by the Ferrari LaFerrari, the GT’s focus on being light means that the car will be meant for chasing lap times and not top speed runs, which is also why the GT steals the fixed seats and adjustable steering and pedals from the LaFerrari. With such high amounts of technology and care going into this legend of a car, its no wonder that Ford has an application that prospective owners must pass in order to buy one. Its just a shame that so few of them will ever be built.

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