Thief Trapped In Car After BMW Remotely Locks Stolen 5 Series' Doors

Crime

Here’s a sweet dose of justice porn to ease you into the week.

Bait Car" was once a popular TV show that aired in the US, which, as it sounds, centers its entire plot on leaving an unlocked car in a bad neighborhood and waiting for a car thief to come around. Some bait cars has the doors unlocked to lure criminals in. Others left the keys in obvious places in attempts to make it seem like the owner forgot them. But all cars were wired up with trackers and the ability to lock the doors and cut the engine to trap fleeing criminals, because the show wouldn't have been fun if the thieves escaped.

Witnessing justice take place on TV is gratifying, but engineers at BMW had a think and realized that the same technology could be applied to their vehicles to help owners whose cars get stolen. According to SPD Blotter, one thief in Seattle, Washington, has just experienced the technology firsthand. The owner of the 550i in question had gotten married a day before the theft and had loaned his buddy the car in the meantime. The friend, being someone who is not accustomed to the proximity key fob, accidentally left the keys in the car where a thief saw them as an opportunity. After getting in and speeding off, the Seattle Police Department got a 91 call around 5:00 A.M., after which officers promptly contacted BMW corporate.

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BMW was then able to track the vehicle and remotely lock the doors, trapping the thief inside. Police were then able to encircle the car, which they found idling in an alleyway with the criminal asleep inside. Once the robber woke up he tried to drive off without much success. Officers arrested the perp and found methamphetamine in his possession (a comedown from which could explain the need for a car nap). In the age of “Find my iPhone,” it makes sense that more automakers are choosing to add similar services, with GM even offering a pursuit-preventing technology through its OnStar service. Here's a tip for those wanting to prevent car theft: get a manual.

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