This 1949 Ford Is Hiding A Big Turbo BMW Heart

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And you'll never guess what this crazy build cost. Hint: not much.

We've seen some pretty interesting mash-ups in our time, and some of them are executed so well that you'd think they came out of the factory like that. One such example is a Chevy Camaro that was transformed into a Pontiac Trans Am, but there are plenty of bad examples too. We've seen a Camaro become a wannabe Ferrari too, and even a Toyota MR2 masquerading as an Audi R8.

The trouble is that cheap builds usually don't look good. That Pontiac Trans Am that was once a stock Camaro is worth six figures, while the other two builds we mentioned cost next to nothing to create. But what if you could have your cake and eat it? What if you could build something cool without breaking the bank? Arizona resident John has done just that, and the results are epic.

Barcroft Cars/YouTube
Barcroft Cars/YouTube

What you're looking at is a 1949 Ford Shoebox "anti-purist" build that was first found sitting in a garage for about 20 years. Someone had begun to build a hot rod from this and had started the chopped roof conversion but never saw it through. John says that he specifically chose this car for the single bullet grille, and when a friend crashed a similarly sized BMW 3 Series, specifically a 2008 335i - that's the one with the immensely capable N54 3.0-liter twin-turbo engine - John decided to buy the wreck from his friend's insurer. Incredibly, both cars cost a total of $3,400, and John really scored with the Bimmer considering that it has a DOC Race single turbo kit, including the upgraded intake manifold and presumably a host of other supporting mods to allow the massive aftermarket turbo to perform at its best.

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Barcroft Cars/YouTube
Barcroft Cars/YouTube
Barcroft Cars/YouTube

Both cars saw their bodies removed from their chassis, and the 335i slid under the Ford with ease. Amazingly, the factory air conditioning and heating systems were retained, as was the cruise control. With the help of some friends, John spent the past year and a half's weekends building the car, his first project in 15 years. He says that while he loves the admiration that onlookers give when they see this car and while he loves the way it drives and looks, what makes this build special is the time spent working on it with his friends. The car now features massive 20-inch wheels and custom bodywork, but rather than make it a show car, all the welds from all the bodywork are being left there to tell a story. It's a remarkable build weighing 3,300 pounds and measuring 16 feet in length, and we're sure it'll be with John for years to come.

Barcroft Cars/YouTube
Barcroft Cars/YouTube
Barcroft Cars/YouTube
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